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I have the following code to plot the minimum spanning tree of a graph

## g is an igraph graph
mst = minimum.spanning.tree(g)
E(g)$color <- "SkyBlue2"

## how to I make mst a different color
E(g)[E(mst)]$color = "red"  ### <---- I WANT TO DO ESSENTIALLY THIS

plot(g,  edge.label=E(g)$weight)

That is, for a simple graph, I find the mst. I want to change the mst to red and plot the mst as part of the main graph. To do this, I want to select the edges of g that are also in mst. How do I do this?


UPDATE:

More generally, I have a graph g0 which is the mst of g, which has n vertices. It was constructed as follows

## implementing the Dijkstra-Prim algorithm
v0 = sample(1:n, 1)
g0 = graph.empty(n=n, directed=FALSE)
weight.g0 = 0
while(length(setdiff(1:n, v0) > 0)) {
  ## chose the shortest edge in the cut set of g

  ## to find the cut, figure out the set of edges where vertex is
  ## in v0 and the other is not
  cutset = E(g)[ v0 %->% setdiff(1:n, v0)]

  ## find the lightest weight edge
  cutweights = E(g)$weight[cutset]
  lightest_edge_idx = which(cutweights == min(cutweights))[1]
  weight.g0 = weight.g0 + min(cutweights)

  ## get the vertices of the lightest weight edge, add to path
  lightest_edge = cutset[as.numeric(cutset)[lightest_edge_idx]]
  vertices = get.edges(g, as.numeric(lightest_edge))

  g0 <- add.edges(g0, vertices, weight=min(cutweights))


  ## now that we have the vertices, add the one that is not in the
  ## graph already
  for(vtx in vertices) {
    if(!(vtx %in% v0)) {
      v0 = c(vtx, v0)
    }
  }

} 

I know I am probably not using a lot of useful features of igraph, but I do get g0 to be a mst at the end of this loop. Given this, I have

E(g0)
Edge sequence:

[1]   8 --  1
[2]   2 --  1
[3]   9 --  8
[4]   9 --  5
[5]   3 --  2
[6]   4 --  3
[7]   7 --  3
[8]  11 --  4
[9]   7 --  6
[10] 11 -- 10
> E(g)
Edge sequence:

[1]   2 --  1
[2]   5 --  1
[3]   8 --  1
[4]   3 --  2
[5]   5 --  2
[6]   6 --  2
[7]   4 --  3
[8]   6 --  3
[9]   7 --  3
[10]  7 --  4
[11] 11 --  4
[12]  6 --  5
[13]  8 --  5
[14]  9 --  5
[15]  7 --  6
[16]  9 --  6
[17] 10 --  6
[18] 10 --  7
[19] 11 --  7
[20]  9 --  8
[21] 10 --  9
[22] 11 -- 10

My question was, how do I assign an attribute to the edges in E(g) that are also in E(g0)?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is actually quite easy because minimum.spanning.tree() keeps edge attributes. So you just need to assign an edge id attribute, and you'll see which edges to color red. It goes like this:

# Some test data, no edge weights, quite boring
g <- erdos.renyi.game(20,2/20)
g
# IGRAPH U--- 20 24 -- Erdos renyi (gnp) graph
# + attr: name (g/c), type (g/c), loops (g/l), p (g/n)

E(g)$id <- seq_len(ecount(g))
mst <- minimum.spanning.tree(g)
mst
# IGRAPH U--- 20 18 -- Erdos renyi (gnp) graph
# + attr: name (g/c), type (g/c), loops (g/l), p (g/n), id (e/n)
E(mst)$id
# [1]  1  2  3  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 16 18 19 20 22 23 24

E(g)$color <- "black"
E(g)$color[E(mst)$id] <- "red"
plot(g)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Gabor, that answered my question partially. My question also related to a graph that I made by hand. I will update my question but also accept your answer. –  stevejb Sep 29 '12 at 16:49
    
OK, I don't know why this is a partial answer, though. IMHO it does exactly what you wanted. –  Gabor Csardi Sep 29 '12 at 17:31
    
Ah, I should have clarified. I realized that I didn't fully ask the question I wanted :) Your answer was perfect. –  stevejb Sep 29 '12 at 21:56
    
What is the reason for reimplementing the spanning tree calculation? Anyway, all you need to do is assigning an edge id attribute to g and then when you add a particular edge to g0, you set the id attribute of the edge in g0 as well. So in the end you'll know which edges in the original graph made it into the mst. –  Gabor Csardi Sep 30 '12 at 2:52
    
Thanks Gabor, that clears things up for me. There is no reason for me to reimplement the spanning tree other than a personal exercise in making sure I understand the algorithm. :) –  stevejb Sep 30 '12 at 23:49

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