Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a simple way in Perl that will allow me to determine if a given variable is numeric? Something along the lines of:

if (is_number($x))
{ ... }

would be ideal. A technique that won't throw warnings when the -w switch is being used is certainly preferred.

share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 81 down vote accepted

Use Scalar::Util::looks_like_number() which uses the internal Perl C API's looks_like_number() function, which is probably the most efficient way to do this. Note that the strings "inf" and "infinity" are treated as numbers.

Example:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

use Scalar::Util qw(looks_like_number);

my @exprs = qw(1 5.25 0.001 1.3e8 foo bar 1dd inf infinity);

foreach my $expr (@exprs) {
    print "$expr is", looks_like_number($expr) ? '' : ' not', " a number\n";
}

Gives this output:

1 is a number
5.25 is a number
0.001 is a number
1.3e8 is a number
foo is not a number
bar is not a number
1dd is not a number
inf is a number
infinity is a number

see also:

[perldoc Scalar::Util][1]
[perldoc perlapi][2] 
share|improve this answer
1  
And as usual with perl docs, finding the actual definition of what the function does is rather difficult. Following the trail perldoc perlapi tells us: Test if the content of an SV looks like a number (or is a number). "Inf" and "Infinity" are treated as numbers (so will not issue a non-numeric warning), even if your atof() doesn't grok them. Hardly a testable spec... –  Day Oct 4 '10 at 14:07
2  
The description in Scalar::Util is fine, looks_like_number tells you if your input is something that Perl would treat as a number, which is not necessarily the best answer for this question. The mention of atof is irrelevant, atof isn't part of CORE:: or POSIX (you should be looking at strtod which has subsumed atof and /is/ part of POSIX) and assuming that what Perl thinks is a number is valid numeric input to C functions is obviously very wrong. –  MkV Oct 18 '12 at 8:15

Check out the CPAN module Regexp::Common. I think it does exactly what you need and handles all the edge cases (e.g. real numbers, scientific notation, etc). e.g.

use Regexp::Common;
if ($var =~ /$RE{num}{real}/) { print q{a number}; }
share|improve this answer

The original question was how to tell if a variable was numeric, not if it "has a numeric value".

There are a few operators that have separate modes of operation for numeric and string operands, where "numeric" means anything that was originally a number or was ever used in a numeric context (e.g. in $x = "123"; 0+$x, before the addition, $x is a string, afterwards it is considered numeric).

One way to tell is this:

if ( length( do { no warnings "numeric"; $x & "" } ) ) {
    print "$x is numeric\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, thank you! This is precisely what I was looking for. –  Juan A. Navarro May 1 '12 at 17:09
    
If I package your routine into a sub, I get a strange behaviour in that it detects non-numeric values correctly, until I try out the first numeric value, which is also detected correctly as true, but then, everything else from there on out is also true. When I put an eval around the length(...) part, however, it works fine all of the time. Any idea what I was missing? sub numeric { $obj = shift; no warnings "numeric"; return eval('length($obj & "")'); } –  yogibimbi Apr 24 '13 at 15:29
    
@yogibimbi: you are reusing the same $obj variable each time; try my $obj = shift;. Why the eval? –  ysth Apr 24 '13 at 16:54
    
oops, my bad, I used my $obj = shift, of course, just did not transfer it correctly from my code to the comment, I edited it a bit. However, sub numeric { my $obj = shift; no warnings "numeric"; return length($obj & ""); } produces the same error. Of course, having a clandestine global variable would explain the behaviour, it is exactly what I would expect in that case, but unfortunately, it's not that simple. Also, that would be caught by strict & warnings. I tried the eval in a rather desperate attempt to get rid of the error, and it worked. No deeper reasoning, just trial & error. –  yogibimbi Apr 25 '13 at 18:47
    
Check it out: sub numeric { my $obj = shift; no warnings "numeric"; return length($obj & ""); } print numeric("w") . "\n"; #=>0, print numeric("x") . "\n"; #=>0, print numeric("1") . "\n"; #=>0, print numeric(3) . "\n"; #=>1, print numeric("w") . "\n"; #=>1. If you put an eval('') around the length, the last print would give a 0, like it should. Go figure. –  yogibimbi Apr 25 '13 at 18:59

Usually number validation is done with regular expressions. This code will determine if something is numeric as well as check for undefined variables as to not throw warnings:

sub is_integer {
   defined $_[0] && $_[0] =~ /^[+-]?\d+$/;
}

sub is_float {
   defined $_[0] && $_[0] =~ /^[+-]?\d+(\.\d+)?$/;
}

Here's some reading material you should look at.

share|improve this answer
2  
This misses many cases, including scientific notation. –  brian d foy Sep 27 '10 at 15:43
    
I do think this digresses a bit, especially when the asker said /simple/. Many cases, including scientific notation, are hardly simple. Unless using this for a module, i would not worry about such details. Sometimes simplicity is best. Don't put the chocolate syrup in the cow to make chocolate milk! –  osirisgothra Nov 2 at 8:30

A simple (and maybe simplistic) answer to the question is the content of $x numeric is the following:

if ($x  eq  $x+0) { .... }

It does a textual comparison of the original $x with the $x converted to a numeric value.

share|improve this answer
    
That will throw warnings if you use "-w" or "use warnings;". –  Derek Park Oct 26 '12 at 15:02

Not perfect, but you can use a regex:

sub isnumber 
{
    shift =~ /^-?\d+\.?\d*$/;
}
share|improve this answer

I don't believe there is anything builtin to do it. For more than you ever wanted to see on the subject, see Perlmonks on Detecting Numeric

share|improve this answer

rexep not perfect... this is:

use Try::Tiny;

sub is_numeric {
  my ($x) = @_;
  my $numeric = 1;
  try {
    use warnings FATAL => qw/numeric/;
    0 + $x;
  }
  catch {
    $numeric = 0;
  };
  return $numeric;
}
share|improve this answer

A slightly more robust regex can be found in Regexp::Common.

It sounds like you want to know if Perl thinks a variable is numeric. Here's a function that traps that warning:

sub is_number{
  my $n = shift;
  my $ret = 1;
  $SIG{"__WARN__"} = sub {$ret = 0};
  eval { my $x = $n + 1 };
  return $ret
}

Another option is to turn off the warning locally:

{
  no warnings "numeric"; # Ignore "isn't numeric" warning
  ...                    # Use a variable that might not be numeric
}

Note that non-numeric variables will be silently converted to 0, which is probably what you wanted anyway.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

If (($x !~ /\D/) && ($x ne "")) { ... }
share|improve this answer

if ( defined $x && $x !~ m/\D/ ) {} or $x = 0 if ! $x; if ( $x !~ m/\D/) {}

This is a slight variation on Veekay's answer but let me explain my reasoning for the change.

Performing a regex on an undefined value will cause error spew and will cause the code to exit in many if not most environments. Testing if the value is defined or setting a default case like i did in the alternative example before running the expression will, at a minimum, save your error log.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.