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I'm doing reverse-engineery stuff and patching a game's memory via DLL. Usually I stick to the same old way of patching everything in a single or several functions. But it feels like it could be pulled off better by using a struct array which defines the memory writes that need to take place and looping through them all in one go. Much easier to manage, IMO.

I wanna make it constant, though. So the data is all there in one go (in .rdata) instead of having to dynamically allocate memory for such things each patch, which is a simple task with 'bytesize' data, for example:

struct struc_patch
{
    BYTE val[8];    // max size of each patch (usually I only use 5 bytes anyway for call and jmp writes)
                    // I can of course increase this if really needed
    void *dest;
    char size;
} patches[] =
{
    // simply write "01 02 03 04" to 0x400000
    {{0x1, 0x2, 0x3, 0x4}, (void*)0x400000, 4},
};
//[...]
for each(struc_patch p in patches)
{
    memcpy(p.dest, p.val, p.size);
}

But when I want to get fancier with the types, I find no way to specify an integer like "0x90909090" as the byte array "90 90 90 90". So this won't work:

struct struc_patch
{
    BYTE val[8];    // max size of each patch (usually I only use 5 bytes anyway for call and jmp writes)
                    // I can of course increase this if really needed
    void *dest;
    char size;
} patches[] =
{
    // how to write "jmp MyHook"? Here, the jmp offset will be truncated instead of overlapping in the array. Annoying.
    {{0xE9, (DWORD)&MyHook - 0x400005}, (void*)0x400000, 5},
};

Of course the major problem is that &MyHook has to be resolved by the compiler. Any other way to get the desired result and keep it const?

I've got little experience with STL, to be honest. So if there is a solution using that, I might need it explained in detail in order to understand the code properly. I'm a big C/C++/WinAPI junkie lol, but it's for a game written in a similar nature, so it fits.

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I found a dirty solution using macroes which I think should work alright, but I'd still prefer a more natural way. Though since it's resolved by the compiler it works exactly how I wanted: #define SPLITDW(v) (BYTE)(v),(BYTE)(v>>8),(BYTE)(v>>16),(BYTE)(v>>24) {{0xE9, SPLITDW((DWORD)&HOOK_LoadHudTextures - 0x400005)}, (void*)0x400000, 5}, Any alternate (and better) suggestions are still appreciated. –  Deji Sep 28 '12 at 22:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I dont think anything from the STL will help you with this, not at compile time. There might be a fancy way of doing with templates what you did with macros. (comma separating the bytes)

But I recommend doing something simple like this:

struct jump_insn
{
    unsigned char opcode;
    unsigned long addr;
} jump_insns[] = {
    {0xe9, (unsigned long)&MyHook - 0x400005}
};

struct mem
{
   unsigned char val[8];
} mems[] = {
    {1,2,3,4}
};

struct struc_patch
{
    unsigned char *val;    // max size of each patch (usually I only use 5 bytes anyway for call and jmp writes)
                    // I can of course increase this if really needed
    void *dest;
    char size;
} patches[] =
{
    // simply write "01 02 03 04" to 0x400000
    {(unsigned char*)(&mems[0]), (void*)0x400000, 4},

    // how to write "jmp MyHook"? Here, the jmp offset will be truncated instead of overlapping in the array. Annoying.
    {(unsigned char*)(&jump_insns[0]), (void*)0x400000, 5},
};

You can't do everything inline and you will need new types for different kind of patches, but they can be arbitrarily long (not just 8 bytes) and everything will be in .rodata.

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Ah, yeah, that's pretty nice and a seemingly "standard" way of doing it. MUCH better than mine as there are no wasted bytes in the array from declaring it to be the largest possible size and I can set up opcode writes easily. Thanks! –  Deji Sep 29 '12 at 1:16

A better way to handle that is to calculate the address difference on the fly. For instance (source):

#define INST_CALL    0xE8

void InterceptLocalCode(BYTE bInst, DWORD pAddr, DWORD pFunc, DWORD dwLen)
{
    BYTE *bCode = new BYTE[dwLen];
    ::memset(bCode, 0x90, dwLen);
    DWORD dwFunc = pFunc - (pAddr + 5);

    bCode[0] = bInst;
    *(DWORD *)&bCode[1] = dwFunc;
    WriteBytes((void*)pAddr, bCode, dwLen);

    delete[] bCode;
}

void PatchCall(DWORD dwAddr, DWORD dwFunc, DWORD dwLen)
{
    InterceptLocalCode(INST_CALL, dwAddr, dwFunc, dwLen);
}

dwAddr is the address to put the call instruction in, dwFunc is the function to call and dwLen is the length of the instruction to replace (basically used to calculate how many NOPs to put in).

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Thanks, but that does the very thing I wanted to move from, as that requires allocating the data to write dynamically and doing a lot of behind-the-scenes work for every patch, and I honestly feel it'd be better to have all the data pre-determined and as const data instead of doing it all on-the-fly. With my current code, the only thing left to do is copy the compiled data (as well as any required protecting - though I prefer to just unprotect the entire EXE in one go and leave it that way). –  Deji Sep 28 '12 at 23:14
    
Well, if you want to avoid the dynamic memory aspect then all you have to do is change BYTE *bCode to BYTE bCode[8]. I think you'll find that generating things on the fly "behind the scenes" will lead to less headaches (for instance in your example if you need to change 0x400005 to something else, you have to change it twice). I'm not sure why you are biased towards having const to patch in (you can still have const data in a struct and repeatedly call PatchCall on the const struct). –  CrazyCasta Sep 28 '12 at 23:23
    
I just think it's a bit of a waste of the compilers power not to do all the work in compile time. Sure I've gotta change 2 addresses, but I've got it like {PATCH_JMP_DATA(0x400000, &HOOK_MyFunc), Ptr32ToPtr(0x400000), 5}, now, so it's barely a bother. Also allows me to have more control, in the event I wanted to write a pointer that isn't relative, etc. And all this is done in compile-time, which saves a lot of mess in the compiled code. I never saw the point in nopping the rest of the written to function either. A waste of time if your hook can just jmp past the broken code. –  Deji Sep 28 '12 at 23:53

To summarize, my solution (thanks to Nicolas' suggestion):

#pragma pack(push)
#pragma pack(1)
#define POFF(d,a) (DWORD)d-(a+5)
struct jump_insn
{
    const BYTE opcode = 0xE9;
    DWORD offset;
};

struct jump_short_insn
{
    const BYTE opcode = 0xEB;
    BYTE offset;
};

struct struc_patch
{
    void *data;
    void *dest;
    char size;
};
#pragma pack(pop)

And in use:

// Patches
jump_insn JMP_HOOK_LoadButtonTextures = {POFF(&HOOK_LoadButtonTextures, 0x400000)};

struc_patch patches[] =
{
    {&JMP_HOOK_LoadButtonTextures, IntToPtr(0x400000)},
};

Using class member const's I can define everything much easier and cleaner and it can simply all be memcpy'd. The pack pragma is of course required to ensure that memcpy doesn't copy the 3 align bytes between the BYTE opcode and DWORD value.

Thanks all, helped me make my patching methods a lot more robust.

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