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I am developing a distributed application. In it, there are roles and sets of permissions that I must validate.
Is a good pratice to throw an exception, in per example, unauthorized access?
Or should I send some message back to the client?

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throw exception... –  Zain Shaikh Sep 28 '12 at 21:31
    
once you know that user is unauthorized, you dont want to execute any further code in any condition, so throwing exception is good. –  Rahul R. Sep 28 '12 at 21:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

On your service operation, you can specify a FaultContract that will serve both purposes like so:

[OperationContract]
[FaultContract(typeof(MyServiceFault))]
void MyServiceOperation();

Note that MyServiceFault must be marked with DataContract and DataMember attributes, in the same way you would a complex type:

[DataContract]
public class MyServiceFault
{
    private string _message;

    public MyServiceFault(string message)
    {
        _message = message;
    }

    [DataMember]
    public string Message { get { return _message; } set { _message = value; } }
}

On the service-side, you are then able to:

throw FaultException<MyServiceFault>(new MyServiceFault("Unauthorized Access"));

And on the client-side:

try
{
    ...
}
catch (FaultException<MyServiceFault> fault)
{
    // fault.Detail.Message contains "Unauthorized Access"
}
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2  
For the OP: you don't want to "throw exceptions". You want to "return faults". That's what this answer shows you how to do. –  John Saunders Sep 29 '12 at 1:03
    
I, personally, believe that is the most elegant approach. Delegating to the WCF to show what to do with an exception. Thank you –  NoProblemBabe Oct 1 '12 at 12:34

Well, you can catch all exceptions in the WCF service implementations methods and rethrow them as FaultExceptions. By doing it this way, the exception will be rethrown on the client with a message of your choosing:

[OperationContract]
public List<Customer> GetAllCustomers()
{
    try
    {
        ... code to retrieve customers from datastore
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Log the exception including stacktrace
        _log.Error(ex.ToString());

        // No stacktrace to client, just message...
        throw new FaultException(ex.Message);
    }
}

To avoid having unexpected errors relayed back to the client, it's also a good practice to never throw Exception instances in code on the server-side. Instead create one or more of your own exception types and throw them. By doing so, you can distinguish between unexpected server processing errors and errors that are thrown due to invalid requests etc:

public List<Customer> GetAllCustomers()
{
    try
    {
        ... code to retrieve customers from datastore
    }
    catch (MyBaseException ex)
    {
         // This is an error thrown in code, don't bother logging it but relay
         // the message to the client.
         throw new FaultException(ex.Message);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // This is an unexpected error, we need log details for debugging
        _log.Error(ex.ToString());

        // and we don't want to reveal any details to the client
        throw new FaultException("Server processing error!");
    }
}
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@DanielPersson- what is a type of the _log? –  Yakov Jan 6 at 14:33
    
@Yakov: A class from the logging framework of your choice. The logging code is mainly there to illustrate how you can have different logging for different kinds of errors. If you're looking for a good logging framework, have a look at log4net. Very mature and easy to use. –  Daniel Persson Jan 6 at 16:48

You wouldn't want to execute any further but you would want to send back to the client what the issues is.

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