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I'm doing a linked list implementation in C. The program reads the data from a file from a file and puts it into a linked list, prints some stuff, and then deletes the link lists and frees the memory. I then run valgrind on it and it tells me that there is a memory leak in my file. Here is my code for processing the file:

while(fgets(line, sizeof line, file) != NULL){
            theData = (ElementStructs*) malloc(sizeof(ElementStructs));
            token = strtok(line, " \t\n");
            strcpy((theData->word), token);

            AddToBackOfLinkedList(theList, theData);
}

/* Do some printing here */

fclose(file);

DestroyLinkedList(theList);

The problem I see is of course that I'm mallocing a new memory block for every data token. However, I'm pretty sure I free the allocated memory blocks in the DestroyLinkedList() function. Here's my code for the DestroyLinkedList() function:

void DestroyLinkedList(LinkedLists *ListPtr){
    LinkedListNodes* curNode = ListPtr->FrontPtr;
    LinkedListNodes* nextNode = curNode->Next;
    while(curNode != NULL){
        free(curNode);
        curNode = nextNode;
        if(curNode!=NULL){
            nextNode = curNode->Next;       
    }
}
 }

Is there anything wrong with the way I'm freeing the memory allocated for my list nodes?

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How is word allocated in your structure ? –  coredump Sep 28 '12 at 21:47
2  
I don't see any free() for ElementStructs allocated in the first snippet. I guess that curNode contains the pointer to the ElementStructs and it is not freed by free(CurNode). You should add something like free(curNode->data) as well to free the memory. Does it make any sense? –  Dany Sep 28 '12 at 21:55
    
Surely Valgrind tells you something more specific than: "there is a memory leak in my file", right? –  ninjalj Sep 28 '12 at 22:24
    
You aren't showing us all the relevant code. Also, there's a NULL pointer dereference hiding in DestroyLinkedList(), actually, it's in plain sight. –  Alexey Frunze Sep 28 '12 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

You need to free the data of the linked list and the data->word (assuming that was dynamically allocated). You can do that in DestroyLinkedList by doing:

void DestroyLinkedList(LinkedLists *ListPtr){
    LinkedListNodes* curNode = ListPtr->FrontPtr;
    LinkedListNodes* nextNode = curNode->Next;
    while(curNode != NULL){
        free(curNode->data->word);
        free(curNode->data);
        free(curNode);
        curNode = nextNode;
        if(curNode!=NULL){
            nextNode = curNode->Next;       
        }
    }
}
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Your LinkedListNodes contains additional data, not only Next. You have to free that data as well:

void DestroyLinkedList(LinkedLists *ListPtr)
{
    if (!ListPtr) return; // Better safe than sorry

    LinkedListNodes* curNode = ListPtr->FrontPtr;
    while (curNode)
    {
        LinkedListNodes* nextNode = curNode->Next;
        free(curNode->WHATEVER); // Corresponds to theData

        // Other frees go here

        free(curNode);
        curNode = nextNode;
    }
}
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