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I am suppose to write a program that returns the shortest distance from point A to point E. I coded to get the length, but I cant figure out how to actually get the points.

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d  = {("A","A"):0, ("A","B"):1, ("A","C"):3, ("A","D"):7 , ("A","E"):101,
           ("B","A"):101, ("B","B"):0, ("B","C"):42, ("B","D"):6, ("B","E"):27,
           ("C","A"):101, ("C","B"):101, ("C","C"):0, ("C","D"):2, ("C","E"):13,
           ("D","A"):101, ("D","B"):101, ("D","C"):101, ("D","D"):0, ("D","E"):5,
           ("E","A"):101, ("E","B"):101, ("E","C"):101, ("E","D"):101, ("E","E"):0
    }

def shortestPath(Cities,Distances):
'''Returns the length of the shortest path from the first city in the list to the last city in the list, using only cities that appear in that list.'''
    if len(Cities)==1: return 0
    else: return min( map( lambda n: (Distances[Cities[0],Cities[n]] + shortestPath(Cities[n:],Distances)), range(1,len(Cities))) )

The answer to the input: shortestPath(["A","B", "C", "D", "E"],d) is 10. But the program should also out put the distances, so the answer should actually be [10, ["A", "C", "D", "E"]]

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So... you want us to debug your program? Or what is your specific question? Did you do some debugging on your own, like having a look what the result of map is? –  Felix Kling Sep 28 '12 at 21:56
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why do you write your shortest path algorithm in this way? Is it mandatory? Otherwise, you could use Dijkstra's SPA since there an easy way of recreating the shortest path. –  Darian Lewin Sep 28 '12 at 22:12
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are determined to keep it in one meaty line, you can make a small change to your code:

def track_past_city(x,y):
    return (x[0]+y[0],x[1:]+y[1:]) #0 is how far you've gone, #[1:] is where you've been

def shortestPath(Cities,Distances):
    if len(Cities)==1: return 0, Cities[0]
    else: return min( map( lambda n: (track_past_city((Distances[Cities[0],Cities[n]],Cities[0]),shortestPath(Cities[n:],Distances))), range(1,len(Cities))) )


shortestPath(["A","B", "C", "D", "E"],d)
# (10, ('A', ('C', ('D', 'E'))))

I'm not quite sure how to where the erroneous tuple addition occurs, but from this you should be able to tweak your own solution...

NOTE: This comes with a health warning, you shouldn't write all your code on one line, it's hard to read, hard to debug and generally a bad idea.

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Looks like a typical shortest path problem. Obvious approach would be to use dijkstra, but there are way cooler algorithms out there. For example, this one I hacked in a codegolf session:

G,S,T=input();J={n:9e9if n!=T else 0for n in G}
while J[S]>1e9:J={n:0if n==T else min(c+J[d]for d,c in G[n].items())for n in G}
while S!=T:print S;S=min((c+J[d],d)for d,c in G[S].items())[1]

You'd have to alter your graph representation though, but it outputs the correct shortest path for this input (paraphrased graph of yours):

{'A': {'C': 3, 'B': 1, 'D': 7}, 'C': {'A': 3, 'B': 42, 'E': 13, 'D': 2}, 'B': {'A': 1, 'C': 42, 'E': 27, 'D': 6}, 'E': {'C': 13, 'B': 27, 'D': 5}, 'D': {'A': 7, 'B': 6, 'E': 5}}, 'A', 'E'

So... read up on graph algorithms, they are not that hard. If you refuse to do so: good luck understanding my codegolfed fixpoint algo.

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+1 for Djikstra and golf humor. –  jamylak Sep 29 '12 at 5:31
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