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I've got this code in a custom class derived from DataGridView:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    if (char.IsNumber(Convert.ToChar(keyData)) || 
        char.IsControl(Convert.ToChar(keyData)) || 
        (keyData >= Keys.NumPad0 && keyData <= Keys.NumPad9) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Up) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Down) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Left) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Right) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Home) ||
        (keyData == Keys.PageDown) ||
        (keyData == Keys.PageUp) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Space) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Back) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Decimal))
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

I can enter data (numbers and .), and tab from cell to cell, but if I hit the "Shift" key, I get, "System.OverflowException was unhandled by user code Message=Value was either too large or too small for a character. Source=mscorlib StackTrace: at System.Convert.ToChar(Int32 value)..."

I assume this is the line that's causing the problem:

char.IsControl(Convert.ToChar(keyData))

...but why is Shift problematic, and what should I do to get it to disregard the Shift key (there's no reason for the user to press the Shift key in the DGV).

UPDATE

I must admit I don't quite understand quetzalcoatl's answer, but I tried to apply it this way:

Keys specials = keyData & Keys.Modifiers; 
Keys keycode = keyData & ~Keys.Modifiers;

if (char.IsNumber(Convert.ToChar(keyData)) || 
    //char.IsControl(Convert.ToChar(keyData)) || 
    //(keyData == specials) || <-- didn't work
    //(keyData == keycode) ||  <-- didn't work
    (keyData != specials) ||
    (keyData != keycode) ||
    . . .

...and still get the same error. How can I apply the information he provided to solve the problem?

UPDATE 2

I'm still struggling with this.

I've tried this:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    Keys keycode = keyData & ~Keys.Modifiers;

    if (keycode >= Keys.D0 && keycode <= Keys.D9 ||          
        keycode >= Keys.NumPad0 && keycode <= Keys.NumPad9 ||
        (keycode == Keys.Up) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Down) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Left) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Right) ||
    (keyData == Keys.Tab) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Tab) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Home) ||
        (keycode == Keys.PageDown) ||
        (keycode == Keys.PageUp) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Space) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Back) ||
        (keycode == Keys.Decimal))
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

...and this approach:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
        Keys keycode = keyData & ~Keys.Modifiers;

        bool isDigit = keycode >= Keys.D0 && keycode <= Keys.D9 ||
                       keycode >= Keys.NumPad0 && keycode <= Keys.NumPad9;
        bool isControl = (keyData & Keys.Modifiers) != Keys.None;

        if (isDigit ||
            isControl ||
            (keyData == Keys.Up) ||
            (keyData == Keys.Down) ||
            (keyData == Keys.Left) ||
            (keyData == Keys.Right) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Tab) ||
            (keyData == Keys.Home) ||
            (keyData == Keys.PageDown) ||
            (keyData == Keys.PageUp) ||
            (keyData == Keys.Space) ||
            (keyData == Keys.Back) ||
            (keyData == Keys.Decimal))
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
}

Both of them solve the Shift key causing an overflow, but both of them prevent a decimal from being entered. I don't understand that, as Decimal is being (supposedly) explicitly allowed. Everything else explicitly checked for is allowed (Home, PageUp, PageDown, etc.) - it's just the "." character that is being barred entry.

UPDATE 3

Using the second approach above and replacing "Keys.Decimal" with "Keys.OemPeriod" works:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    Keys keycode = keyData & ~Keys.Modifiers;

    bool isDigit = keycode >= Keys.D0 && keycode <= Keys.D9 ||
                   keycode >= Keys.NumPad0 && keycode <= Keys.NumPad9;
    bool isControl = (keyData & Keys.Modifiers) != Keys.None;

    if (isDigit ||
        isControl ||
        (keyData == Keys.Up) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Down) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Left) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Right) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Home) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Tab) ||
        (keyData == Keys.PageDown) ||
        (keyData == Keys.PageUp) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Space) ||
        (keyData == Keys.Back) ||
        (keyData == Keys.OemPeriod))
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do not convert a Keys to char. This does not work. Test if it is a digit with

Keys code = keyData & ~Keys.Modifiers;

bool isDigit = code >= Keys.D0 && code <= Keys.D9 ||
               code >= Keys.NumPad0 && code <= Keys.NumPad9

Test if it is a control key with

bool isControl = (keyData & Keys.Modifiers) != Keys.None;
share|improve this answer
    
I'm marking this as the answer because all I needed to do with my original code was incorporate this and replace "Keys.Decimal" with "Keys.OemPeriod" (see Update 3 to my original post). –  B. Clay Shannon Oct 1 '12 at 16:29

This is because you are translating the Keys keyData into Char in a wrong way. Convert.ToChar does not handle that.

The Keys enumeration contains `` mask that should be used to filter-out all modifiers like shift, alt, control:

Keys specials = keyData & Keys.Modifiers;
Keys keycode = keyData & ~Keys.Modifiers;

Now, the keycode is equal to exactly one of the normal A/B/C/... values defined in Keys, and specials is a bitset composed of Control/Alt/Shift modifiers.

The exact cause of the error is that while some of the 'lower key values' (a,b,c,..z,0-9, etc) are in fact equal/similar to ASCII codes, then the 'modifiers' are provided as a very high integer numbers that are bitwise-or'ed to the base key code:

Keys justA = Keys.A;
Keys theAandShift = Keys.A | Keys.Shift;

etc. This causes that 'A with Shift' has a numeric value completely absurdal in sense of ASCII or even Unicode .. and this is why you have to cut off the modifiers codes first!

edit:

Keys specials = keyData & Keys.Modifiers;
Keys keycode = keyData & ~Keys.Modifiers;

bool withShift = specials.HasFlag( Keys.Shift );
bool withControl = specials.HasFlag( Keys.Control );
bool withAlt = specials.HasFlag( Keys.Alt );

if(keycode == Keys.F1 && !withShift && !withControl && !withAlt)
    ; // it was plain F1 with no specials

else if(keycode == Keys.VolumeUp)
    ; // it was 'volume-up' key with any or none of the modifiers

else if(keycode >= Keys.A && keycode <= Keys.Z && withControl)
    ; // it was CTRL+Letter

else if(keycode >= Keys.D0 && keycode <= Keys.D9 && withShift)
    ; // it was SHIFT+Digit

and so on

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I'm (reasonably) sure you're right, but I don't know how to apply what you're saying to solve my problem. I updated my post to show what I did try, which didn't change anything. –  B. Clay Shannon Sep 28 '12 at 22:25
    
Please check the edit, I've included an if-tree showing how to check the keys and modifiers. Note that I've left the specials variable despite it is not important: only "filtered" keycode is needed, and the 'withshift' (and similar) can be read directly from the keydata. I mean, specials.HasFlag(Keys.Shift) is completely equal to keyData.HasFlag(Keys.Shift). I've included the specials variable only to show how the highbit and lowbit parts of the keyData are organized. Highbits are the Modifiers (Shift,Control,Alt), and Lowbits are keycodes. –  quetzalcoatl Sep 28 '12 at 22:43
    
Btw this is exactly why in the Keys enumeration you have Control and RControlKey LControlKey members: Control is the Modifier, while L/RControlKey is the keycode. Hope this helps:) –  quetzalcoatl Sep 28 '12 at 22:44
    
Is this really the easiest way to "throw away" the Shift key? –  B. Clay Shannon Sep 28 '12 at 22:47
    
Ah, and also please note that I deliberately do not use the Convert.ToChar(). Convert.ToChar is used for ASCII-like conversions, while the Keys enumeration has some values that does not match ASCII values, thus Convert+Char.IsDigit and similar may fail. This is why it is better to just-compare to the Keys like I did. –  quetzalcoatl Sep 28 '12 at 22:47

Keys can't be converted to a char like that. If you look at Shift in the Keys enumeration, it has a value of 65536 which is out of bounds for a char

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