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I have a coffeescript class that has some jquery event listeners. I would like to use the fat arrow => to avoid having to reference the class, but I still need a reference to the element that would usually be used with this. How can I use both?

class PostForm
    constructor: ->
        $('ul.tabs li').on 'click', =>
            tab = $(this)
            @highlight_tab(tab)
            @set_post_type(tab.attr('data-id'))

    highlight_tab: (tab)->
        tab.addClass 'active'

    set_post_type: (id) ->
        $('#post_type_id').val(id)
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Can you describe a bit more what you want to do? Where do you want to use (this), and what part of the above is not working the way you want? IOW, what object do you want this to be a reference to? The target of the event, the PostForm class instance, etc? –  Giscard Biamby Sep 28 '12 at 22:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

CoffeeScript links both this and @ to the outer context, therefore you cannot access the context that jQuery provided (aka the desired "this"). Use event.target instead:

class PostForm
    constructor: ->
        $('ul.tabs li').on 'click', (event) =>
            tab = $(event.target)
            @highlight_tab(tab)
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1  
event.target saves us in Backbone.js as well –  InspiredJW Sep 30 '12 at 15:00
2  
event.target is also far less confusing to someone who doesn't know the DOM rules around this. –  Nevir Mar 14 '13 at 23:51
7  
Note that you probably want evt.currentTarget if you do events with selectors. See codepen.io/ddopson/pen/erLiv –  Dave Dopson Mar 15 '13 at 0:08
2  
what do you do on d3? callbacks in d3 give you the object (not DOM) –  Dan Apr 8 '13 at 9:32

Using evt.currentTarget

You should probably use evt.currentTarget (which is equivalent to this) instead of evt.target (which isn't). If the node that you are tapping for click notifications has child nodes, evt.target might be one of those child nodes instead of the node you added the click handler to.

See http://codepen.io/ddopson/pen/erLiv for a demo of this behavior. (click on the inner red box to see that currentTarget points at the red div while target points at outer blue div that the event handler is registered on)

$('ul.tabs li').on 'click', (event) =>
  tab = $(event.currentTarget)
  @highlight_tab(tab)

Answer to the question asked - getting both `=>` and `this`:

You can do the following...

$('ul.tabs li').on 'click', (event) =>
  tab = $(` this `)     # MAKE SURE TO ADD THE SPACES AROUND `this`
  @highlight_tab(tab)

The spaces are critical as they prevent Coffee from munching this into _this.

Using `self` and `->`

Alternatively, do the following ...

self = this
$('ul.tabs li').on 'click', (event) ->
  tab = $(this)
  self.highlight_tab(tab)

This is similar to CQQL's answer, except that I prefer the idiomatic use of self as the variable name; my VIM syntax highlighting rules color self as a "special" variable just as it would for this, arguments, or prototype.

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self = this is exactly what I do. It works perfectly! –  Kirk Oct 25 '13 at 19:13

I prefer this version, because I can understand it more easily.

class PostForm
    constructor: ->
        post_form = this

        $('ul.tabs li').on 'click', (event) ->
            tab = $(this)
            post_form.highlight_tab(tab)
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