Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In MATLAB, how could I combine two matrices of data measured at different frequencies such that the result is indexed at the higher frequency? Since the data measured at the lower frequency will have many unknown values in the result, I would like to replace them with the last known value in the matrix. There is a lot of data so a vectorized solution would be preferred. I've added some sample data below. Thanks!

Given:

    index1  data1  index2  data2
    1       2.1    2       30.5
    2       3.3    6       32.0
    3       3.5    9       35.0
    4       3.9    13      35.5
    5       4.5    17      34.5
    6       5.0    20      37.0
    7       5.2    ...     ...
    8       5.7
    9       6.8
    10      7.9
    ...     ...

Result:

    index1  data1  data2
    1       2.1    NaN
    2       3.3    30.5
    3       3.5    30.5
    4       3.9    30.5
    5       4.5    30.5
    6       5.0    32.0
    7       5.2    32.0
    8       5.7    32.0
    9       6.8    35.0
    10      7.9    35.0
    ...     ...    ...

EDIT: I think the following post is close to what I need, but I'm not sure how to transform the solution to fit my problem. http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/newsreader/view_thread/260139

EDIT (Several Months Later): I've recently come across this excellent little function that I think may be of use to anyone who lands on this post:

function yi = interpLast(x,y,xi)
%INTERPLAST Interpolates the input data to the last known value.
% Note the index data should be input in ASCENDING order.
inds = arrayfun(@findinds, xi);
yi = y(inds);

function ind = findinds(val)
    ind = find(x<=val,1,'last');
    if isempty(ind)
        ind = 1;
    end
end

end

Credit goes here: http://www.mathworks.com/support/solutions/en/data/1-48KETY/index.html?product=SL&solution=1-48KETY

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is one of run length decoding. See section 15.5.2 of Matlab array manipulation tips and tricks (which is an eye-opening read for any Matlab enthusiast).

Here's using the method with your example (I'm using octave but the code is identical for Matlab):

octave:33> a=[2,30.5;6,32;9,35;13,35.5;17,34.5;20,37]
a =

    2.0000   30.5000
    6.0000   32.0000
    9.0000   35.0000
   13.0000   35.5000
   17.0000   34.5000
   20.0000   37.0000

octave:34> i=a(:,1)-1
i =

    1
    5
    8
   12
   16
   19

octave:35> j=zeros(1,i(end))
j =

   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

octave:36> j(i(1:end-1)+1)=1
j =

   0   1   0   0   0   1   0   0   1   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   1   0   0

octave:37> j(1)=1
j =

   1   1   0   0   0   1   0   0   1   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   1   0   0

octave:38> val=a(:,2)
val =

   30.500
   32.000
   35.000
   35.500
   34.500
   37.000

octave:39> x=val(cumsum(j))
x =

   30.500
   32.000
   32.000
   32.000
   32.000
   35.000
   35.000
   35.000
   35.500
   35.500
   35.500
   35.500
   34.500
   34.500
   34.500
   34.500
   37.000
   37.000
   37.000

And pad the beginning with NaN as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I believe this is exactly what I need. Furthermore, thank you for pointing me to that tips and tricks manual. I'll be sure to save it for future reference. –  user1656007 Sep 29 '12 at 0:38

I recently had the same problem as you: I had data, measured by different systems, which had to be synchronized and processed.

My solution consisted of putting the measurement data and time information (frequency, time at start of measurements) in a class object. Then I implemented a multiplication, addition, etc. method for that class that automatically took care of all the necessary things, being:

  • upsampling the lower frequency signal (with linear interpolation (interp1)
  • shifting one of the signals, so the data lines up in time
  • cutting off the non-overlapping data set at beginning and end (with two different systems you never start or stop measuring at the same time, so there is some excess data)
  • actually performing the multiplication
  • returning the result as a new class object

Next to that there were other functions of which you can guess what they do: plot, lpf, mean, getTimeAtIndex, getIndexAtTime, ...

This allowed me to simply do

signalsLabview = importLabViewSignals(LabViewData);
signalsMatlab = importMatlabSignals(MatlabData, 100); %hz

hydrPower = signalsLabview.flow * signalsMatlab.pressure;
plot(hydrPower);

or things like that. If you have a lot of these signals on which you have to do some math, this really helps and results in clear code. Otherwise you have a lot of general code just for doing the syncing, shifting, trimming around each operation. Also for quickly checking things it's easy.

If you have to do this things a lot, I think it's definitely worth investing some time in it to build a proper framework.

Unfortunately I don't think I can disclose this code (IP and such), but it wasn't rocket science.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.