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What does time(NULL) return? Given documentation I had assumed it returns the number of seconds since epoch, however, when I run the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include "Time.h"
#include "Math.h"

int main () {

    double curT = 0;
    double curJ = 0;

    time_t curTtimeT = 0;
    double curJtimeT = 0;

    //run indefinitely... use a debugger you can stop :-)
    for (double j = 0; j < 2000000000; j++) {

        //get the current time
        curT = time(NULL);
        curTtimeT = time(NULL);

        //check if current time equals previous time
        if (time(NULL) != curT) {
            //output time and approx. "time" through iteration
            std::cout << "Time match with doubles:\t" << curT << "\tdeltaJ:\t\t\t" << (j - curJ) <<std::endl;
            curT = time(NULL);
            curJ = j;
        }

        if (time(NULL) != curTtimeT) {
            //output time and approx. "time" through iteration
            std::cout << "Time match with time_t:\t\t" << curTtimeT << "\t\tdeltaJtimeT:\t\t" << (j - curJtimeT) <<std::endl;
            curTtimeT = time(NULL);
            curJtimeT = j;
        }

    }
    return 0;
}

I get the following results (the skipping does not appear to have a pattern between runs):

Time match with time_t:     1348873002      deltaJtimeT:        290842
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         2.41017e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         1.08409e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         2.16587e+06
Time match with time_t:     1348873007      deltaJtimeT:        5.36928e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         1.08696e+06
Time match with time_t:     1348873008      deltaJtimeT:        1.08696e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         1.08534e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         3.18296e+06
...
Time match with time_t:     1348873122      deltaJtimeT:        2.16217e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         6.42553e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         1.08727e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         2.14147e+06
Time match with doubles:    1.34887e+09 deltaJ:         1.04733e+06
Time match with time_t:     1348873130      deltaJtimeT:        8.42965e+06

Note: I am using the deltaJ output to show a bit more numerically what is a clear visual difference in terms of when the console actually outputs results from this loop.

Clearly, this does not seem to consistently be returning the number of seconds since epoch, as I would instead be able to see a very consistent output of very close to 1 line for both double and time_t per second. Instead, I miss the entire range between 1348873002 and 1348873007 - none of these values appear to be found via time(NULL). These gaps appear consistently throughout the entire runtime of this loop.

Additionally, sometimes it does not even output for some of the seconds (see the gap between 1348873122 and 1348873130).

I don't understand why the output doesn't show one entry for both variable types, for each second of real time. Instead, it seems time(NULL) inconsistently returns the number of seconds since epoch, and actually skips some values.

What am I missing?

I am running these tests on a 2.4GHz dualcore Macbook Pro, in X-Code 3.2.5, on Snow Leopard (perhaps this issue is specific to my system)?

share|improve this question
    
Fix your #include directives. #include "Time.h" should be #include <time.h>, and #include "Math.h" should be #include <math.h>. These probably aren't the cause of your problem, but you should fix them anyway. (Jonathan Leffler noticed this.) –  Keith Thompson Sep 28 '12 at 23:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Clearly, this does not seem to consistently be returning the number of seconds since epoch, I would instead be able to see a very consistent output of very close to 1 line for both double and time_t per second.

This doesn't follow. I think you intended for your code to be something a bit different than it actually is.

Specifically, I think you need to change this:

    //run indefinitely... use a debugger you can stop :-)
    for (double j = 0; j < 2000000000; j++) {

        //get the current time
        curT = time(NULL);
        curTtimeT = time(NULL);

to this:

    //get the current time
    curT = time(NULL);
    curTtimeT = time(NULL);

    //run indefinitely... use a debugger you can stop :-)
    for (double j = 0; j < 2000000000; j++) {

because as it is, you have a sort of race condition: you're testing if the return-value of time changes during certain portions of the loop. Obviously that won't happen 100% of the time; sometimes the second will roll over during one part of the loop, and other times it will roll over during a different part.

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Thanks, this is the only answer which explains why I was having the issue I was having. I didn't realize how using =time(NULL) followed by a comparison using !=time(NULL) would affect the logic of the loop, but your answer makes it relatively obvious in hindsight. –  enderland Sep 29 '12 at 3:40

I think your test code got a little over-complicated. Your first column looks correct, but you aren't displaying all the digits so you aren't seeing the seconds count up. And using time_t plus double is just muddying up the output. Try this--it's pretty kludgy but it displays the new time every second.

#include <iostream>
#include "Time.h"

int main () {
    //get the current time
    time_t currtime = time(NULL);

    //run indefinitely... use a debugger you can stop :-)
    for (double j = 0; j < 2000000000; j++) {

        //wait until a second has passed
        while (time(NULL) < currtime + 1) {
        };
        currtime = time(NULL);
        std::cout << "Time: " << currtime << "\n";
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
BTW, I wouldn't count on this as a clock. It's just to illustrate what time(NULL) returns. –  SSteve Sep 28 '12 at 23:44

See <time.h> or time():

time_t time(time_t *res);

The type of time_t is normally a signed integer type.

Since you use "Time.h", you may have a different definition of time() altogether.

I prefer <cstdio> to get neatly aligned and formatted output (I'm a C programmer more than a C++ programmer), but the code can be made to compile as:

#include <ctime>
#include <cstdio>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    double curT = 0;
    double curJ = 0;

    time_t curTtimeT = 0;
    double curJtimeT = 0;

    //run indefinitely... use a debugger you can stop :-)
    for (double j = 0; j < 2000000000; j++)
    { 
        //get the current time
        curT = time(NULL);
        curTtimeT = time(NULL);

        //check if current time equals previous time
        if (time(NULL) != curT) {
            printf("CurT:      %16.2f;  deltaJ: %16.2f\n", curT, j - curJ);
            curT = time(NULL);
            curJ = j;
        }

        if (time(NULL) != curTtimeT) {
            printf("CurTtimeT: %13lld;     deltaJ: %13lld\n", (long long)curTtimeT, (long long)(j - curJtimeT));
            curTtimeT = time(NULL);
            curJtimeT = j;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

That produces output such as:

CurT:         1348875805.00;  deltaJ:       1215329.00
CurT:         1348875806.00;  deltaJ:       1403669.00
CurTtimeT:    1348875806;     deltaJ:       2618998
CurTtimeT:    1348875807;     deltaJ:       1395183
CurT:         1348875808.00;  deltaJ:       2815155.00
CurT:         1348875809.00;  deltaJ:       1401716.00
CurTtimeT:    1348875809;     deltaJ:       2821688
CurT:         1348875810.00;  deltaJ:       1410729.00
CurT:         1348875811.00;  deltaJ:       1411382.00
CurTtimeT:    1348875811;     deltaJ:       2822111
CurTtimeT:    1348875812;     deltaJ:       1420231
CurT:         1348875813.00;  deltaJ:       2840762.00
CurTtimeT:    1348875815;     deltaJ:       4242399
CurT:         1348875816.00;  deltaJ:       4231937.00

The Cur* values make sense; the deltaJ values are unrelated because you do a difference between the loop counter and the time value. I'm not sure what you expect to see.

(MacBook Pro, 2.3 GHz Intel Core i7, Mac OS X Lion 10.7.5, GCC 4.6.0 — I need to recover my later versions of GCC after the disaster earlier this week.)

share|improve this answer
    
I think MacOS file systems are case-insensitive by default; #include "Time.h" is likely to find the same header file as #include <time.h>, so that's probably not what's causing the problem. But yes, the #include directives should definitely be fixed. –  Keith Thompson Sep 28 '12 at 23:33
    
I created a file Time.h containing #include <ctime> and (aghast with horror) using namespace std;, and much the same for Math.h. It compiles. It also compiles without those files — because, as you say, the file system is case-preserving but case-insensitive. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '12 at 23:40

You assume here that your application runs without any interference: your system is a pre-emptive system, thus sometimes the OS might intersect your process to work on something else: your "time leaps" might be because of that (even though I'm still curious if it'd abandon your process for 5 seconds, that still might happen)...

Also, I think your code might work differently due to some optimisations done without you expecting them: I'd recommend checking the settings of your compiler and disabling optimisations to see if there's any difference...

You might try checking any overflows too, even though this is most unlikely, considering your system (64 bit integer ought to be enough for what you do here)...

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I would instead be able to see a very consistent output of very close to 1 line for both double and time_t per second.

That is exactly what you shouldn't expect to see. You should expect to see a lot of apparent randomness, and that is exact what you do see. Each iteration of your loop is making two to six calls to time() and is sometimes generating formatted output, sometimes not. I/O is expensive, formatted I/O is extremely expensive, and system calls such as time(): They're expensive, too.

Your computer is doing lots of other things than running your application. It's creating the contents that need to be displayed on your screen, it's checking to see whether your computer needs to be updated, it's running some antivirus program, it's updating some browser page you didn't close, etc. The CPU is constantly switching context between running your program and running those myriad of other active programs. Those systems calls are a perfect place (and a preferred place) to switch context.

There are eight places within each iteration of your loop where your program is inviting the OS switch context. It's not at all surprising to see a lot of variation.

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