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I have a question on how the objects stored in set are compared.

class A
{
public:  
char * name;
};

I am storing objects of A in a set. I am provide a comparator class which provides implementation of operator() ( A &ob1, A & ob2 ). Here I compare ob1.name & ob2.name and return true when ob1.name is lesser than ob2.name.

Will I be able to search for an object using the find() of set ? I have provided implementation only for operator(). Will this be sufficient ? Could someone explain how find() works in this case ?

Thanks in advance

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1  
What's operator(A& ob1, A& ob2)? Do you mean operator<(const A& ob1, const A& ob2)? –  jamesdlin Sep 28 '12 at 23:44
    
He probably means operator() (A&, A&). –  Ivan Vergiliev Sep 28 '12 at 23:48
    
Yes, Ivan u r right. Correcting my question. –  KodeWarrior Sep 28 '12 at 23:50
    
By the way, you should make sure to release the memory pointed to by name, or just use a string and get it automatically. –  Ivan Vergiliev Sep 28 '12 at 23:52
    
This is just sample code. –  KodeWarrior Sep 28 '12 at 23:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The function that will be used in std::set::find() is an instance of the Comparator class that you declared as a template parameter of your set.

template < class Key, class Compare = less<Key>,
           class Allocator = allocator<Key> > class set;

Concretely, the comparator instance will be passed to Key objects and should return true if the first is located before the second. So yes, your implementation is fine.

Now, to dig further: if you want to convince yourself, you can dig into the source code of gcc’s implementation of the standard library, and you’ll find:

  template<typename _Key, typename _Val, typename _KeyOfValue,
           typename _Compare, typename _Alloc>
    typename _Rb_tree<_Key, _Val, _KeyOfValue,
              _Compare, _Alloc>::iterator
    _Rb_tree<_Key, _Val, _KeyOfValue, _Compare, _Alloc>::
    find(const _Key& __k)
    {
      iterator __j = _M_lower_bound(_M_begin(), _M_end(), __k);
      return (__j == end()
          || _M_impl._M_key_compare(__k, _S_key(__j._M_node))) ? end() : __j;
    }

You can see that _M_key_compare (which is an instance of the _Compare class you provided), is called with __k as a first parameter (one of your Key) and the return value of _S_key(...) which is a key. The return value of _M_key_compare is used in a ternary expression, so it should be a boolean.

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Thanks. How is equality test done ? We have provided implementation only for < right ? –  KodeWarrior Sep 28 '12 at 23:46
1  
@KodeWarrior std::set doesn't require an equality test, only strict weak ordering –  Praetorian Sep 28 '12 at 23:57
2  
@KodeWarrior, I think it is more accurate to say that STL algorithms define "equality" (or more accurately, equivalence classes) on the basis that if neither a < b nor b < a are true, a and b are "equal" (in the same equivalence class). So < is all that's needed. –  rici Sep 29 '12 at 0:29
    
So yes, your implementation is fine -- Well, only kind of. The keys in a set are stored as const objects which means that the comparator needs to take the arguments by const& –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 29 '12 at 2:17
    
@ rici -- Thanks, that makes a lot of sense. @David -- Thanks for your comment. This is just a sample code. –  KodeWarrior Sep 29 '12 at 9:45

Will I be able to search for an object using the find() of set ? I have provided implementation only for operator(). Will this be sufficient ?

Yes, it will be sufficient to provide only comparator class with implementation for operator ()(A&,A&) only. See default comparator std::less<>.

Could someone explain how find() works in this case ?

Very simple speaking: std::set<T,comparator>::find(k) returns iterator it if and only if both comparison fails:

  1. false == comparator(k,*it)
  2. false == comparator(*it, k)

Otherwise it returns std::set<>::end()...


Speaking in mathematical sense - std::set define equality by its weak ordering by this formula:

  a == b  <==>  !(a < b) && !(b < a)
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I am storing objects of A in a set. I am provide a comparator class which provides implementation of operator() ( A &ob1, A & ob2 ).

That is not correct. The container std::set maintains the elements ordered according to the comparator that is configured in the second template argument. To guarantee that the order invariant is not broken, the container stores the keys as constant objects, and that in turn means that the comparator must take the keys by const &.

In general, comparators should offer operator() that takes two elements by const-reference and the member function should be const itself:

struct comparator : std::binary_function<A,A,bool> {
   bool operator()( A const& lhs, A const& rhs ) const;
};
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you can use set.find or set.count, set::find() returns set::end() if element is not found, similary count is zero if element is not found..

set<Item*> itemSet;

Item* item = new Item();    

if (itemSet.count(item) == 0)
{
    std::cout<<"not found"
}
//or
if (itemSet.find(item) == itemSet.end())
{
    std::cout<<"not found"
}
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Doesn't answer my question. –  KodeWarrior Sep 28 '12 at 23:36

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