Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When i write code i have to use loops e.g.

$six = 6;
for ($i = $six; $i > 1; $i--) {
   echo $i."<br>";
}

outputs

6
5
4
3
2

i need it to output 1 as well i know i can do for ($i = 6; $i >= 1; $i--)

or for ($i = $six+1; $i > 1; $i--) in evaluation but its confusing so muchg! in fact i always confused when using for statement.

EDIT: its confusing because i dont like to think backwards.. id like to run loop not while condition $six > 1 is true, but rather before condition like $six = 1 is meet.

the opposite way i guess

loop_before ($six==1) {
   echo $six.<br />;
   $six--;
}

well even this one wont output 654321... guess i just need to go back to school. got to do

loop_before ($six<1) {
   echo $six.<br />;
   $six--;
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Karoly Horvath, martin clayton, Andro Selva, WATTO Studios, Fluffeh Sep 29 '12 at 8:10

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Read php.net/manual/en/control-structures.for.php to understand how the loop works. You'll get used to it once you've done it enough times. –  NullUserException Sep 28 '12 at 23:52
1  
maybe you might benefit from explaining why you are confused. The code reads pretty clearly when you think about it. Loop beginning at 6 and count down. If $i is greater than 1 keep going. in your case, when $i hits 1 it no longer meets the requirement of being greater than one, as you wrote, so it does not print. Straight forward. –  Kai Qing Sep 28 '12 at 23:54
    
I'm not sure this is a question - you seem to know the syntax, and why it's failing, but you're just saying it confuses you? –  ernie Sep 28 '12 at 23:54
    
Ok perhaps i should remember that The first expression (expr1) is evaluated (executed) once unconditionally at the beginning of the loop. In the beginning of each iteration, expr2 is evaluated. If it evaluates to TRUE, the loop continues and the nested statement(s) are executed. If it evaluates to FALSE, the execution of the loop ends. At the end of each iteration, expr3 is evaluated (executed). –  John Smith Sep 28 '12 at 23:56
    
Ok ernie its confusing because i dont like to think backwards i like to run loop not while condition is true but rather before condition is meet in expr2 –  John Smith Sep 28 '12 at 23:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This confusion may not be only for for() statement but for other types of loop. You can use $six >= 1 or $six > 0

Example 1

$six = 6;
do {
    echo $six . "<br>";
    $six --;
} while ( $six >= 1 );

Example 2

$six = 6;
for($i = $six; $i >= 1; $i --) {
    echo $i . "<br>";
}

Example 3

$six = 6;
while ( $six >= 1 ) {
    echo $six . "<br>";
    $six --;
}

Lastly you might decide not to even use any default PHP loop

$six = 6;
__loop($six);

function __loop($x) {
    echo $x . "<br>";
    $x --;
    ($x < 1) ? $x : __loop($x);
}

They would all return the same thing

6
5
4
3
2
1
share|improve this answer

Simply change your "base case" to $i > 0

Alternatively, change the operator to $i >= 1

share|improve this answer
    
If i work not with array or array that starts with 1 (not 0) and use $i > 0 then if i have to use $i inside loop i going to have to do $i+1 each time which confusing even more. –  John Smith Sep 28 '12 at 23:54
    
No, no. :) You can do it with this without making it confusing. Just remember that array index values ALWAYS start at 0, not 1. Therefore, you will need to loop ONE extra time in your for() loop somehow, whether that is setting the base case to 0 instead of 1, or adding $i+1 as you have suggested. This is a VERY common beginner error called "off by one" error. But don't feel bad, because even the most advanced programmers in the world still make this mistake, because it is not natural for the human being to start counting from 0 instead of 1. :) –  L0j1k Sep 29 '12 at 0:00
    
@L0j1k not always ;) –  meze Sep 29 '12 at 0:05
1  
There are exceptions to every rule. If you naturally count from zero, you probably also speak in broad generalities to other human beings. ;) –  L0j1k Sep 29 '12 at 0:07

To explain more clearly, you're saying to perform the code in the loop if $i > 1

So if $i is 1 then it will not perform the code. 1 is not greater than 1.

As lojik said use $i > 0 or $i >= 1

share|improve this answer
    
I guess >= is the better way than changing the number +1 or -1. –  John Smith Sep 29 '12 at 0:00
    
I think the better way is what makes the most sense to you. But I agree and would prefer to use >= myself in this case. –  Syntax Error Sep 29 '12 at 0:03

In English, the for loop syntax is doing this:

At the start of the loop, $i is equal to $six.
Run the loop 'while' $i is greater than 1.
At the end of each running on the looping statement, decrement 1 from $i.

So, when $i is decremented to the value of 1, the conditional statement $i > 1 no longer returns true, because it is checking that $i is greater than 1.

Like lojik said, use $i > 0 or $i >= 1, therefore when $i is equal to 1, the condition passes, and stops because on the next loop, $i is less than the compared value (in your example 1). After the for loop, if you checked the value of $i, you will see it equals 0, which fails the condition.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.