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I'm currently writing an assembly NASM on a 64 bit machine to print the factorial of a given input, and then return the input. The program works correctly for printing out the factorial values, but the return value is not returning the input. Yes, the code is horrible, and I don't want you to simply rewrite the whole thing. (This is my homework.) I just want someone to explain why my return register (rax) is NOT preserving the value it had from the start.

extern read_input
extern print_int
call read_input

push rax   ;save n
mov rcx, 1 ;counter
push rcx   ;save counter
push rdi   ;save print int

jmp test

print:
pop rdi
imul rdi, rcx ;multiply by current counter
push rdi      ;save our multiplication factor
call print_int

pop rdi
pop rcx 
pop rax    ;restore trashed variables
add rcx, 1 ;increment counter by 1
push rax   ;push stuff back on stack
push rcx
push rdi

jmp test

test:
cmp rcx, rax
jle print

pop rax 
pop rcx 
pop rdi ;clear stack
ret

Output:

Please enter an input value:
read_input> Returning 4 (0x4)
Printing integer 1 (0x1)
Printing integer 2 (0x2)
Printing integer 6 (0x6)
Printing integer 24 (0x18)
Program complete.  Return 24 (0x18)

I want it to return my input, which in this case would be 4.

Any insight would be appreciated.

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Thank you for not using the deprecated homework tag -- it saves us from those arguments. –  Linuxios Sep 29 '12 at 2:05
    
I didn't know that there was even a "homework" tag, or that such a thing was taboo. Now I know, I guess? –  derp Sep 29 '12 at 2:23
    
@derp About a year late, but yes. –  Qix Jul 22 at 2:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The order of the pushes and pops is wrong.

The pushes:

push rax   ;save n
mov rcx, 1 ;counter
push rcx   ;save counter
push rdi   ;save print int
...
push rax   ;push stuff back on stack
push rcx
push rdi

The pops:

pop rdi
pop rcx 
pop rax    ;restore trashed variables
...
pop rax 
pop rcx 
pop rdi ;clear stack
ret

At the end rax and rdi are swapped, oops.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops is correct! Thanks. –  derp Sep 29 '12 at 2:14

The thing is, places in the stack don't have names, or identifiers. You have to push and pop in the same order. When you say pop rax, the processor doesn't go say "Where is the last entry that was made by push rax?", but rather says "Where is the latest thing to be pushed?". So your stack looks like this (assuming rax 1, rbx 2, rcx 3):

0x0001 #push rax
0x0002 #push rbx
0x0003 #push rcx
  |
  \----- This is the value retrieved by pop rax

Just follow this rule: Always push things in the same order as you pop them, unless you are explicitly trying to switch values (which is better done with xchg).

Note: Doing things in the wrong order can be used to set the values of things like the rflags register:

push 0x0000000000000000 ;New value for rflags
popf ;Pop it into rflags
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