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I'd like to make a reasonably simple game with great looking graphics.

I've gone through several tutorials for creating opengl samples. I understand the core objects are points and triangles. I also understand mapping textures and applying lighting. I must be missing something conceptual.

Lets take an example - a simple car. I'll need to see the car from every angle in 3D. That means I mathematically have to construct the car in 3D? I'll literally have to create and store thousands of triangles that represent its entire surface? Then, I'll add color/textures to those triangles?

What if I wanted to animate navigation through a park - the trees, path, other people... even if I just modeled each unique type of object just once, that could take years?!

What approach do commercial game developers use?

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closed as not constructive by Nicol Bolas, genpfault, pb2q, Toon Krijthe, Sergey K. Sep 29 '12 at 20:00

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What are you asking here? It seems to me this has nothing to do with OpenGL. –  TheAmateurProgrammer Sep 29 '12 at 5:58
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@theAmateurProgrammer: Actually, it has nothing to do with programming. This seems to be about how to create models, not write code. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 29 '12 at 6:01

2 Answers 2

There are a couple ways of going about this. The first way is to design all of the objects yourself. This is what professional game design companies do, and the have whole departments devoted to this. You could use Blender (free!), Maya, 3DS Max, Modo, or any number of 3D modelling programs to do this.

The second way is to do procedural generation of all of these objects (which is honestly more fun). Procedural generation is when your program generates every object it needs on the fly. This makes your disk space usage minimal, and completely eliminates loading times. Often, the procedural generation algorithms will be run in a separate thread so as to not hurt frame rate.

Realistically, you might want to do a little of both: Procedurally generate the plants, and the environment, but model the characters and the cars.

Here is a good resource for procedural generation algorithms.

Cheers, Ned

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That means I mathematically have to construct the car in 3D? I'll literally have to create and store thousands of triangles that represent its entire surface? Then, I'll add color/textures to those triangles?

Indeed this is the case. However nobody hardcodes models by typing numbers into a file. People use 3D modelers like 3DS, SoftImage, Blender, Milkshape, Maya, etc. Those modelers usually all operate on the triangle-tesselated-mesh principle, i.e. they represent the models as meshes of triangles.

What if I wanted to animate navigation through a park - the trees, path, other people... even if I just modeled each unique type of object just once,

Animation normally happens as dynamic modification of only a single mesh, or in the case of compound objects, like a car, of the individual meshes in choreography.

that could take years?!

For a single person: Yes, it does. That's why game studios employ a large number of artists, who, while working together, still need months to years to finish large scale production games.

In your average game studio it is very likely to find 10 to 20 times more artists than programmers. While the work of the programmers is complicated, it's ubiquous throughout the game. Any new feature or bugfix will often benefit the whole game. However most artwork in a game is used locally, i.e. only in a handfull or a single map. Some artwork, like nonplayer character animation (walk cycles, actions, attack-/defense animations, etc.) may be reused, but even those tend to be individualized for each character to keep up variety. Also common props can be reused. But all in all doing all the artwork for a game is a very lengthy and tedious task.

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I'm disappointed that this was closed as non-constructive. It is titled as a conceptual question and I haven't found any documentation that illuminates the approach as well as this question and the good answers. Isn't approach as important as technical/implementation details? Thanks to those of you who answered. –  torpedo51 Oct 1 '12 at 5:56
    
@torpedo51: Well, SO is a forum about programming questions, and hoestly, your question doesn't really fit those. You'd probably better helped at gamedev.stackexchange.com or similar. –  datenwolf Oct 1 '12 at 9:10
    
I would have appreciated if someone would have redirected me initially, rather than to simply close the question as "not constructive". I'll have a look elsewhere; thx. –  torpedo51 Oct 2 '12 at 17:39

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