Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems to me these two views are virtually identical, especially since Galileo. Is this true, or am I missing out on some features of one or the other?

share|improve this question
2  
I had never noticed the Project explorer... –  pjp Aug 12 '09 at 9:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 47 down vote accepted

According to the Eclipse help, the Project Explorer

provides a hierarchical view of the artifacts in the Workbench, which is customized by the specific configuration of your Workbench.

With only the java developer tools (JDT) installed the Project Explorer nearly looks and behaves for java projects as the Package Explorer (including refactoring and other source code operations in the context menu). But Project Explorer is usable for other languages and project types as well.

Additional plugins contributes "extra information" to the Project Explorer view making it much more "sophisticated". For example if you have the web tools installed and you have a Dynamic Web Project, the Project Explorer shows you additional tree nodes like Deployment Descriptor and JavaScript Resources. You can see (and configure) all available contributions in Project Explorer / Customize View... / Content.

For example using SpringSource Tool Suite 2.1.0 I have additional nodes for web projects, spring beans and web services. Because of this I favor using the Project Explorer.

share|improve this answer
2  
"the Package Explorer shows you additional tree nodes" - did you mean "the Project Explorer shows you additional tree nodes"? –  Petr Gladkikh Dec 28 '09 at 9:01
    
Thanks, corrected :) –  Csaba_H Dec 28 '09 at 9:26
1  
Also, the Project Explorer doesn't open a project on double click - the Package Explorer does. –  cypressious Oct 17 '11 at 17:35
1  
One thing the Project Explorer is missing (that really bugs me) is "Other Projects" when working with Working Sets so you can "lose" projects pretty easily. You can track/vote for this issue at bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=266030. –  studgeek Sep 18 '12 at 0:03

I believe the Project Explorer is meant as the successor for the Navigator, and is (for the most part) language-agnostic.

The Package Explorer is specifically for Java projects, that's why it has stuff like refactoring in its context menus. The Package Explorer also shows Java classes and packages (as the name implies), while the Project Explorer shows folders and .java files.

share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly 'Navigator' supports horizontal scrolling whereas 'Package Explorer' does not - please upvote: bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=201984 –  Daniel Sokolowski Sep 15 at 14:39

My Project Explorer hides folders that belong to a source code management system while the Package Explorer shows e.g. the .git folder. Also, the Package Explorer offers more options that work with the source code, e.g. the refactoring stuff.

share|improve this answer

Some differences I see (in Juno) on a Java project:

  • In Project Explorer, context menu > New gives common Java artifacts, like Class, Interface, Enum, package... In Package Explorer, I see various kind of Projects, Web service, Folder, File, etc.
  • In Package Explorer, I can drag'n'drop a class file between two packages, it will automatically do the refactoring (move and change package, and imports in other classes). Project Explorer just won't allow me to do a drag'n'drop.
  • And as said, Project Explorer shows more information, eg. a Deployment Description, JavaScript resources, Deployed Resources, etc. whereas the Package Explorer is Java-centric.

That's why I keep the two tabs side-by-side. :-)

share|improve this answer

One thing I just noticed is that, at least when developing Java Android apps, Projects will not show up in the Package Explorer if their project.properties file is borked or non-existent.

I had only been using the Package Explorer and had the Project Explorer hidden, and I was pulling my hair out trying to figure out why my imported project wouldn't show up. My console was saying the project had no .properties file but it was not visible for me to right click -> fix properties. Then I opened the Project explorer and it was there as it should be.

share|improve this answer

One reason for preferring the Project Explorer is it is the only explorer that appears in the list when you select "Show In" on a non-code file (e.g. text file, XML file etc.) being edited.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.