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here is a haskell question: input numbers repeatedly until user input 0, and then show these number in order.

I know how to place a list of int in order. this is my code:

placeinorder :: [Int] -> [Int]
placeinorder [] = []
placeinorder [x] = [x]
placeinorder (pivot:xs) = placeinorder left ++ [pivot] ++ placeinorder right
                where left = filter (<pivot) xs
                      right = filter (>pivot) xs

and moreover, I know how to get Int from the input:

 getInt :: IO Int 
 getInt = do 
        line <- getLine
        return (read line :: Int)

but I don't know how to change the input numbers into a list...and then i can use the placeinorder function.

can someone write the proper code for me ?

Thanks so much!!!!

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1  
n.b. Your definition of placeinorder is equivalent to placeinorder xs = sort (nub xs), where both sort and nub are defined in Data.List. – dave4420 Sep 29 '12 at 14:10

can someone write the proper code for me ?

No. It looks too much like homework.

can someone give me valuable hints so I can do it myself?

I'll gladly try.

So you have your placeinorder function of type [Int] -> [Int]. You have getInt to read a single Int, of type IO Int. Obviously, you still need a function getIntList :: IO [Int].

Once you have that function, you are mostly done. In your main function, you'll have to call it and stick the result into the standard print function (which we'll pretend has type print :: [Int] -> IO () - in reality, it is more general).

So, how do you write getIntList? Use recursion.

Get one integer. If it is zero, you have just read an empty list. If it is not, use recursion to read the rest of the list. Then put the number you have read and the rest of the list you have just read together.

Once you've translated the above to Haskell, you're done.

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Thanks! I have tried, but it's not working.... – Justin Sep 29 '12 at 9:40
    
Could you tell me where is wrong? getIntList :: IO [Int] getIntList = do number <- getInt if number == 0 then return [] else (do a <- getIntList return (a:[]) ) – Justin Sep 29 '12 at 9:41
    
I see you have figured it out yourself in the meantime, but for the record: you want "return (number : a)". – wolfgang Sep 29 '12 at 13:21

I have got the answer by myself!

here is the code!

main = do 
      putStrLn "Please input numbers: "
      a <- getIntList
      print (placeinorder a)

getInt :: IO Int 
getInt = do 
        line <- getLine
        return (read line :: Int)

getIntList :: IO [Int]
getIntList = do 
           number <- getInt
           if number == 0 
                 then return []
                 else (do 
                          a <- getIntList
                          return (convert_to_list number a))

convert_to_list :: Int -> [Int] -> [Int]
convert_to_list 0 [] = []
convert_to_list x [] = [x]
convert_to_list x xs = x:xs


placeinorder :: [Int] -> [Int]
placeinorder [] = []
placeinorder [x] = [x]
placeinorder (pivot:xs) = placeinorder left ++ [pivot] ++ placeinorder right
                where left = filter (<pivot) xs
                      right = filter (>pivot) xs
share|improve this answer

Maybe I'm lost but I fail to see how convert_to_list is different then the function (:) other then the case where the first arg is 0. Since you special case the 0 answer the first argument of convert_to_list is never 0. replace convert_to_list with (:)

Also if this isn't a homework assignment(or if implementing mergesort isn't part of the assignment) haskell has a sort function(Data.List.sort) I'm not sure what kind of sort it uses(probably quicksort or mergesort) which can replace placeinorder. Also you can change the type signature of placeinorder to

placeinorder :: Ord a => [a] -> [a] 

to make it a generic sort(this may make it slightly slower).

edit:

Also if you leave the read function like it is it will give you

* Exception: Prelude.read: no parse

If your users feed you bad data(ie strings that don't parse to Ints), I recommend changing getInt to return IO (Maybe Int)(and possibly printing a warning for bad inputs).

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