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I have the following code in C#:

string query = "SELECT * FROM Zboruri WHERE cod_aeroport = " + country;

using (var command = new SqlCommand(query, connection))
{
    var list = new ArrayList();
    var reader = command.ExecuteReader();

    if (reader.HasRows)
    {
         while (reader.Read())
         {
             string data1 = reader.GetString(1);
             string data2 = reader.GetString(2);
             list.Add(cod_aeroport);
             list.Add(data1);
             list.Add(data2);
         }
    }
    else
    {
        string raspuns = "nu este info";
        list.Add(raspuns);
    }

    reader.Close();
    connection.Close();
    return list;
 }

My database table has these columns:

data1(numeric(18,0))
data2(numeric(18,0))
...........

and it giving me error:

Index was outside the bounds of the array.

on this line of code:

string data2 = reader.GetString(2); 

How can I fix error?

share|improve this question
    
If your SELECT returns two columns - those are columns #0 and #1 - there is no column #2 .... –  marc_s Sep 29 '12 at 10:19
1  
Parametrize your query - you're vulnerable to SQL injection –  Lucero Sep 29 '12 at 10:24
2  
Also, ArrayList is considered pretty, er, old-school these days. Look into generic lists (List<T>) if you're using .NET 2.0 or later. –  tomfanning Sep 29 '12 at 10:29

4 Answers 4

index starts at 0, not 1

string data1 = reader.GetString(0);
string data2 = reader.GetString(1);
share|improve this answer

I'll prefer to use the column names retrieve from the table because it gives more description than using index of the column (which is usually the reason for index out of bounds exception)

ex,

string data1 = reader["colName1"].ToString();
string data2 = reader["colName2"].ToString();

side-note: please do use parameters in your query,

string query = "SELECT * FROM Zboruri WHERE cod_aeroport = @country";

and before you call ExecuteReader add this line,

command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@country", country);
var reader = command.ExecuteReader();
share|improve this answer

The index is zero based, so the first column is 0, the second is 1. You should really use the named version of the columns though;

string data1 = reader["data1"].ToString();

One more thing, you should probably parameterize your query to avoid SQL injection problems, in this case it's almost as simple as your original query and much safer. It also helps the database save quite a bit of time and memory on similar queries;

string query = "SELECT * FROM Zboruri WHERE cod_aeroport = @country";
using (var command = new SqlCommand(query, connection))
{
    command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@country", country);
    var list = new ArrayList();
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help, your advice was helpful to me! –  Igor Sep 29 '12 at 11:41
    
@user1582145 You should probably find the most helpful answer to your question and mark the question as solved by that answer, that will help others find better solutions on this site. –  Joachim Isaksson Sep 29 '12 at 12:59

You should better access them by name, by resolving the index by name using the GetOrdinal() method first, so that the code doesn't break if the query is extended later.

if (reader.HasRows)
{
     int data1Index = reader.GetOrdinal("data1");
     int data2Index = reader.GetOrdinal("data2");
     while (reader.Read())
     {
         string data1 = reader.GetString(data1index);
         string data2 = reader.GetString(data2index);
         list.Add(cod_aeroport);
         list.Add(data1);
         list.Add(data2);
     }
}

Note that this is the slightly better approach compared to using the named indexer because it avoids looking up the index on every row.

Also, please do parametrize the query to avoid SQL injection.

share|improve this answer
    
for column: data1(numeric(18,0)) it using reader.GetOrdinal(), bat if column: name(nvarchar(50)) what should by? –  Igor Sep 29 '12 at 15:43
    
@Igor, GetOrdinal() just maps the column name to the index that you need to use for the GetXxx() methods - the type of the column is irrelevant at that point. –  Lucero Sep 29 '12 at 16:20

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