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I have code that looks something like this:

select t1.colId, t1.col1, t1.col2, t1.col3, count(t2.colId)
from table1 t1 left outer join

(select colId from db1.tb90) t2 
on t1.colId = t2.colId
group by 1,2,3,4

I want to copy all rows from t1, and t2 should join where there is a match.

However, t1.colId can include duplicates and want these duplicates to exist.

My current issue is that the select statement performs a distinct on t1.colId so I get the number of distinct t1.colId as oppose of including duplicates.

Is the issue with on t1.colId = t2.colId?

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Are you trying to show the same total count of t2.colId on every row where t1.colId = t2.colID? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Sep 29 '12 at 13:26

2 Answers 2

YOu ask: Is the issue with on t1.colId = t2.colId? and the answer is, Not, the issue is with group by. Try to aggregate by colId in subquery:

select t1.colId, t1.col1, t1.col2, t1.col3, n
from table1 t1 left outer join    
   (select colId, count(*) as n 
    from db1.tb90 group by colId) t2 
on t1.colId = t2.colId

EDITED DUE OP COMMENT

Ok, here some data to understand your question:

create table table1 (
  colId int,
  col1 int,
  col2 int,
  col3 int
);

create table tb90 (
  colId int
);

insert into table1 values
( 1,1,1,1),
( 1,1,1,1),
( 2,2,2,2);

insert into tb90 values
(1),
(1),
(3);

Your query results:

select t1.colId, t1.col1, t1.col2, t1.col3, count(t2.colId)
from table1 t1 left outer join
(select colId from tb90) t2 
on t1.colId = t2.colId
group by 1,2,3,4;

| COLID | COL1 | COL2 | COL3 | COUNT(T2.COLID) |
------------------------------------------------
|     1 |    1 |    1 |    1 |               4 |
|     2 |    2 |    2 |    2 |               0 |

My query results:

select t1.colId, t1.col1, t1.col2, t1.col3, n
from table1 t1 left outer join    
   (select colId, count(*) as n 
    from tb90 group by colId) t2 
on t1.colId = t2.colId

| COLID | COL1 | COL2 | COL3 |      N |
---------------------------------------
|     1 |    1 |    1 |    1 |      2 |
|     1 |    1 |    1 |    1 |      2 |
|     2 |    2 |    2 |    2 | (null) |

Now, write expedted results.

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unfortunately that returns the same as distinct number –  user159603 Sep 29 '12 at 12:49
    
While the OP will give you a definitive answer, I expect that the intent was to get a count of 0 (not NULL) when there are no entries for a give t1.colID value in table tb90. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '12 at 14:40
    
@JonathanLeffler, please, be free to edit my answer and write the coalesce function in right place. Thanks about your comment. –  danihp Sep 29 '12 at 15:11

Given the following data:

CREATE TABLE table1
(
    colID   INTEGER NOT NULL,
    col1    INTEGER NOT NULL,
    col2    INTEGER NOT NULL,
    col3    INTEGER NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY(colID, col1, col2, col3)
);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES(1, 1, 1, 1);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES(1, 2, 1, 1);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES(1, 1, 2, 1);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES(1, 1, 1, 2);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES(2, 2, 1, 1);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES(2, 1, 2, 1);
CREATE TABLE db1.tb90
(
    colID   INTEGER NOT NULL,
    col4    INTEGER NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY(ColID, Col4)
);
INSERT INTO db1.tb90 VALUES(1, 1);
INSERT INTO db1.tb90 VALUES(1, 2);
INSERT INTO db1.tb90 VALUES(1, 3);
INSERT INTO db1.tb90 VALUES(1, 4);
INSERT INTO db1.tb90 VALUES(1, 5);

Your query:

SELECT t1.colId, t1.col1, t1.col2, t1.col3, COUNT(t2.colId)
  FROM table1 t1
  LEFT OUTER JOIN (SELECT colId FROM db1.tb90) t2 
    ON t1.colId = t2.colId
 GROUP BY 1, 2, 3, 4;

produces the output:

colid   col1    col2    col3    (count)
1       1       1       1       5
1       1       1       2       5
1       1       2       1       5
1       2       1       1       5
2       1       2       1       0
2       2       1       1       0

when run against IBM Informix Dynamic Server 11.70.FC2 on Mac OS X 10.7.5.

If this is the answer that Teradata gives for the same data, then the fact that the query plan does a duplicate elimination is not a probem; the answer is correct. If this is not the answer that Teradata gives for the same data, there is probably a bug in Teradata (IMNSHO, though I have to be careful casting aspersions on other people's DBMS since I work on Informix for IBM).

If I've misunderstood the problem, then please provide sample table schemas and values along with actual and expected outputs, so that we can review what is going on more clearly. You might want to supply the explain output too.


Note that you could rewrite the query as:

SELECT t1.colId, t1.col1, t1.col2, t1.col3, t2.colId_count
  FROM table1 t1
  JOIN (SELECT t3.colID, COUNT(*) AS colId_count
          FROM (SELECT DISTINCT colID FROM table1) AS t3
          LEFT JOIN db1.tb90 AS t4 ON t3.colId = t4.colId
         GROUP BY t3.colID
       ) t2
    ON t1.colId = t2.colId;

You can see that there's a DISTINCT operation on table1 in this reformulation; it might be that Teradata is making the transform for you automatically.

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