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Given a design of:

Player
===========
PlayerID
TeamID
FirstName
LastName
DateOfBirth

Team
===========
TeamID
TeamName
Grade

Match
===========
MatchID
HomeTeamID
AwayTeamID
Date
Result

I am using this:

 CREATE TABLE Match(
   MatchID VARCHAR2(5) NOT NULL,
   Dateofmatch date,
   Result VARCHAR2(1) ,
   HomeTeam VARCHAR2(5),
   AwayTeam VARCHAR2(5),
   CONSTRAINT MatchPK PRIMARY KEY(MatchID),
   CONSTRAINT HomeFK FOREIGN KEY(HomeTeamIDFK) REFERENCES TEAM(TeamID),
   CONSTRAINT AwayFK FOREIGN KEY(AwayTeamIDFK) REFERENCES TEAM(TeamID),
   CONSTRAINT Result
   Check (Result in (‘W’,’L’,’D’)
   );

to create the Match table assuming that Match ID,Player ID and teamID colums are of data type VARCHAR2(5). The result of the match refers to homeTeam and can only be W,L or D.

Is this correct?


I have come out with this kindly correct me

CREATE TABLE Match (
    MatchID VARCHAR2(5) NOT NULL,
    Dateofmatch date,
    Result VARCHAR2(1) ,
    HomeTeam VARCHAR2(5),
    AwayTeam VARCHAR2(5),
    CONSTRAINT MatchPK PRIMARY KEY(MatchID),
    CONSTRAINT HomeFK FOREIGN KEY(HomeTeamIDFK) REFERENCES TEAM(TeamID),
    CONSTRAINT AwayFK FOREIGN KEY(AwayTeamIDFK) REFERENCES TEAM(TeamID),
    CONSTRAINT Result Check (Result in (‘W’,’L’,’D’)
);
share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried anything? –  lanzz Sep 29 '12 at 12:43
    
What you have tried? –  nKandel Sep 29 '12 at 12:43
    
This looks a lot like you have not spend any time googling for any hint on the create syntax. I suggest you find documentation for creating tables in SQL and try building the statement on your own. If you should get stuck, come back here and ask specific questions. To try your statement, you can use an open sql interface, for instance www-db.in.tum.de/~muehe/sql –  Henrik Mühe Sep 29 '12 at 12:43
2  
VARCHAR2 is an Oracle datatype, not a MySQL datatype. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 29 '12 at 12:56
1  
@Henrik: Any thing approaching standard SQL is a bad choice for testing MySQL. SQLFiddle will let you test on a MySQL server. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Sep 29 '12 at 13:14

1 Answer 1

I would aim for something more like:

CREATE TABLE match
   ( match_id INTEGER, 
     date_of_match  DATE, 
     result_type  char(1), 
     home_team_id INTEGER, 
     away_team_id INTEGER,
     CONSTRAINT match_pk PRIMARY KEY(match_id),
     CONSTRAINT home_fk FOREIGN KEY(home_team_id_fk) REFERENCES TEAM(team_id),
     CONSTRAINT away_fk FOREIGN KEY(away_team_id_fk) REFERENCES TEAM(team_id)
     CONSTRAINT result_type CHECK (result_type in (‘W’,’L’,’D’)
  )

I know the datatypes for the fk's are supposed to be varchar2(5) but I suggest they either be changed or you find those tables true primary key which would be an integer or have one added. It's the right thing to do (though opinions will vary).

share|improve this answer
    
Next qns is i must then include a column that records both socres of the teams. a team would nv score more than 999 in a match. My answer ALTER TABLE Match ADD Score VARCHAR(2) ADD CONSTRAINT Score CHECK (Score<99) –  user1692068 Sep 29 '12 at 13:35

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