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I have a table with a couple of thousand rows: from this I need to extract a total for column WTE for each value in column band, including those where the total is 0. I also need each total to be in a column of its own, so that I can easily update a summary table.

The code I have at present returns the values from the relevant rows:

SELECT 
   IF(band="E",WTE,0) AS `Band6_WTE`
FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
ON o.instance_FK = i.id
WHERE i.region = 14

But when I add SUM(), the return is incorrect (zero, when it should be several thousands):

SELECT 
   IF(band="E",SUM(WTE),0) AS `Band6_WTE`
FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
ON o.instance_FK = i.id
WHERE i.region = 14

I have looked at http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/MySQL/Pivot_table, but I do not understand how that approach should be applied to my problem.

What should I do?

share|improve this question
    
Unless the list of bands is very small, 'each total to be in a column of its own, so that I can easily update a summary table' is going to make for very messy, tedious processing. It's also likely to be fragile; if a new band appears, you'll have to modify the summary table and the query to make use of it. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '12 at 14:13
    
Thanks Jonathan: I agree, but 1) there are only a dozen or so bands; 2) this is an annual task only; and 3) the security of using a summary table (which can be exported into a different database for exposure on our members' website) outweighs the inconvenience. –  hnmcc Oct 1 '12 at 12:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you must sum if:

SELECT
    SUM(IF(band="E",WTE,0)) AS `Band6_WTE`
FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
ON o.instance_FK = i.id
WHERE i.region = 14
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, that's exactly what I need: it's obvious now, but it wasn't before... –  hnmcc Sep 29 '12 at 13:16

In this particular case, wouldn't it be easier to use WHERE?

SELECT SUM(WTE) AS `Band6_WTE`
FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
ON o.instance_FK = i.id
WHERE i.region = 14
AND band = "E"

For the general case, you could use GROUP BY since you say you need the result for each band (each value in column band):

SELECT band, SUM(WTE) AS `WTE`
FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
ON o.instance_FK = i.id
WHERE i.region = 14
GROUP BY band

This will give either NULL or 0, you can instead use IFNULL to convert NULL to 0 if you like:

IFNULL(SUM(WTE), 0)

Edit: as you pointed out in the comments, you'd like multiple columns for the different bands rather than multiple rows. Generally speaking, you should not do that from SQL (use the second query and perform a pivot operation from your code), but there are exceptions, cases where it's significantly more complicated to do that outside of SQL, so here's how you could do it:

SELECT
    (SELECT SUM(WTE)
    FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
    LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
    ON o.instance_FK = i.id
    WHERE i.region = 14
    AND band = "E") AS `Band6_WTE`,
    (SELECT SUM(WTE)
    FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
    LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
    ON o.instance_FK = i.id
    WHERE i.region = 14
    AND band = "F") AS `Band7_WTE`,
    (SELECT SUM(WTE)
    FROM  `orthoptists` AS o
    LEFT JOIN `instances` AS i
    ON o.instance_FK = i.id
    WHERE i.region = 14
    AND band = "G") AS `Band8_WTE`

The precise syntax might need a little bit of tweaking (some databases require each SELECT to include a FROM clause, some may require a name for each column in a subselect, I don't think MySQL does but I can't check right now), but the principle should be applicable regardless.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Yeah that's what struck me too. –  Michael Durrant Sep 29 '12 at 13:25
    
Thanks for your suggestion, but no: this is where I was before asking the question. In the first instance, I would need to do c.150 queries to get all the results I need; and in the second, I don't get results that are complete (including all those where the sum = 0) or presented in separate columns. –  hnmcc Sep 29 '12 at 15:03
    
@hnmcc From your question, it's not clear why you would need additional queries, and if you do, what additional queries you would need. It's also not clear how the answer you accepted avoids the need for additional queries. Could you elaborate? –  hvd Sep 29 '12 at 15:04
    
@hvd I'm creating a summary table for transfer into a separate database (different users, different purpose). The summary table (which has a lot of manually-gathered data from previous years in it) has separate columns for Band6_WTE and so on by region: 12 bands and 15 regions means a lot of permutations. Vitaly's solution overcomes this. –  hnmcc Sep 29 '12 at 15:10
    
@hnmcc Ah, I see. That's still possible with my answer too, by using subqueries, and I'll edit my answer to give an example for two columns. –  hvd Sep 29 '12 at 15:12

Noody has explained why your original query give you the incorrect result.

The original query has an aggregation function in the SELECT clause. This tells MySQL that this is an aggregation. There is no GROUP BY clause, so it returns one row, treating all rows as a single group.

Now, what happens to band in this case? In the SQL standard or any other dialect of SQL, the original query would return an error, saying something like band is not aggregated.

MySQL has a (mis)feature called Hidden Columns, which allows this syntax. It takes a random value of band from all the rows for the comparison. The value might have the value "E", in which case the sum of all WTE is returned. Or, it might have another value, in which case 0 is returned.

In general, you should avoid using Hidden Columns. Any "bare" column in your SELECT statement should also be in the GROUP BY clause, when you have an aggregation query.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Gordon. I was using GROUP BY, but what I got back was a single column sorted by band and not showing bands where the result was 0 - which is not what I need. –  hnmcc Sep 29 '12 at 15:13

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