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I'm trying to make each column of my table 25% the width of the page. When I have more than four columns, I want to be able to horizontally scroll the table to view the other columns.

So I set the width of all cells to a fixed number of pixels (equal to 25% of my fixed page width). And I tried setting overflow-x to both scroll and then auto. But in both cases, column widths were compressed so that the table width never exceeds the width of the page.

It seems like my cell widths are completely ignored! How can I tell the browser to respect my column widths and allow the table to grow wide enough to accommodate them?

Note: I'm programmatically building the page with ASP.NET MVC. I don't know ahead of time how many columns there will be. But I do know the number of columns when I'm constructing the HTML.

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Seriously, 15.5k in rep and you don't have the relevant markup and CSS in the question? With a jsfiddle.net demo? –  Jared Farrish Sep 29 '12 at 14:28
    
So far, I'm unable to repro this on jsfiddle. Guess there's some hidden style out there that prevents this from behaving normally and I'll just need to figure it out on my own. –  Jonathan Wood Sep 29 '12 at 14:41
    
Is this sort've what you're talking about? jsfiddle.net/userdude/3SKwP –  Jared Farrish Sep 29 '12 at 14:42
    
If you know what you want the min-width of the cells to be, you can use that to keep the cells from shrinking, but will grow beyond the body's overflow: jsfiddle.net/userdude/3SKwP/1 (Note, only tested in Chrome.) –  Jared Farrish Sep 29 '12 at 14:46
    
@JaredFarrish: I don't even get the horizontal scrollbar, although I can see that the width of your last column is not as specified. Note that I'm using Twitter Bootstrap so there is a lot of things going on. Browsing the styles in Chrome, I found tables were set to max-width: 100%, but changing this to none had no effect. –  Jonathan Wood Sep 29 '12 at 14:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given the problem:

body {
    width: 100%;
}
#percent {
    width: 100%;
}
#percent td {
    width: 25%;
    background: #cdd;
}​

<p>Percent only</p>
<table id="percent">
<tbody>
    <tr>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
    </tr>
</tbody>
</table>

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/3SKwP/

The width of the table will not flow beyond the width of body element, as both are set to a relative amount of 100%.

To compensate for the lack of a defined width to force the body to overflow, you can use min-width on the td elements:

#percent,
#fixed {
    width: 100%;
}
#percent td,
#fixed td {
    width: 25%;
    background: #cdd;
}
#fixed td {
    min-width: 150px;
}​

<p>min-width: 150px</p>
<table id="fixed">
<tbody>
    <tr>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
        <td>Test</td>
    </tr>
</tbody>
</table>​

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/3SKwP/1/

The downside to this, if you want to call it that, is that IE7 doesn't support min-width. So you'll have to shim something for it if you need to support it. But otherwise, this should work out pretty well for you.

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