Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a countdown like this one:

var countdown = {
    startInterval: function() {
        var count = 600
        var countorig = 600;
        var currentId = setInterval(function() {
            var min = (count - (count % 60)) / 60;
            var sec = count % 60;
            if (sec < 10) {
                $('#timer').html(min + ':0' + sec);
            } else {
                $('#timer').html(min + ':' + sec);
            }
            $('#time').val(countorig - count);
            if (count == 0) {
                $('#form').submit();
            }--count;
        }, 1000);
        countdown.intervalId = currentId;
    }
};

It works. But if I load the page, the countdown starts but it stutter it is not "round" like a clock is.

JSFiddle.

share|improve this question
    
You mean because it's called every second? You can call the set interval every 100 or 50 MS and account for that in your counting. –  Little Big Bot Sep 29 '12 at 14:39
    
Do you have any working demo? –  Miszy Sep 29 '12 at 14:39
    
Could you create a JSFiddle showing the problem? –  Thomas Sep 29 '12 at 14:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

setInterval isn’t exact. You should use Dates instead, to get an accurate time, and then choose an interval of less than one second to get a smoother clock. Here’s a demo!

var countdown = {
    startInterval: function() {
        var count = 600;
        var start = new Date(); // The current date!

        var currentId = setInterval(function() {
            var difference = Math.max(0, count - (new Date() - start) / 1000 | 0);
            var min = difference / 60 | 0;
            var sec = difference % 60;

            $('#timer').text(min + ':' + (sec < 10 ? '0' : '') + sec);
            $('#time').val(difference);

            if(count === 0) {
                $('#form').submit();
            }
        }, 200);

        countdown.intervalId = currentId;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, works great. –  Mike Oct 1 '12 at 18:07

It's never a good idea to assume your timers are exact. Instead, use delta timing.

var startTime = new Date().getTime();
setInterval(function() {
    var elapsed = new Date().getTime()-startTime;
    console.log("Been running for "+Math.floor(elapsed/1000)+" seconds");
},25);
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming you don't fire it right as it changes, (new Date).getTime() === Date.now(), and Date.now() has much less overhead than (new Date).getTime() –  Paul S. Sep 29 '12 at 17:21
    
But Date.now() is not supported across all browsers. –  Niet the Dark Absol Sep 29 '12 at 20:19

That is because setInterval is not meant to be a high resolution timer. It will NOT hit every 1000 milliseconds on the dot. You might have swings as much as 20 to 30 milliseconds in either direction, resulting in a clock that is off.

share|improve this answer

Using Date.now(), this is a quick example of a countdown function ( x is milliseconds )

function countdown(x){
    var o = {future: Date.now()+x, last:-1, i:null}; // object so we can pass by-ref if req.

    o.i = setInterval( function() { // use o.i so we can clear interval
        var remain = o.future - Date.now(),
            secs = Math.floor( remain / 1000 ),
            mins = 0;

        if( remain < 0 ){ // finished, do whatever
            return clearInterval(o.i); // then clear & exit
        }

        if( secs === o.last ) return; // skip this iteration if it's not been a second
        o.last = secs; // else update last time

        // do whatever you want for this new second
        if( secs > 59 ) mins = Math.floor( secs / 60 ), secs = secs % 60;
        console.log(
            (mins < 10 ? '0'+mins : mins) + ':' +
            (secs < 10 ? '0'+secs : secs) + ' remain.'
        );
    }, 100);
}

If you know it wont be used in IE, consider adding o as an argument to the callback function in the interval and also as the last argument to setInterval (so it is passed to the callback as first arg), which means closure is independent => callback can be defined anywhere.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.