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If you use the using method instead of lets say FileStream.Close();, will the class dispose correctly?

private static string GetString()
{
    using(FileStream fs = new FileStream("path", FileMode.Open))
    using(StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fs))
    {
         return sr.ReadToEnd();
    }
}

is equivalent to:

private static string GetString()
{
    string toReturn = "";           

    FileStream fs = new FileStream("path", FileMode.Open)
    StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fs)

    toReturn = sr.ReadToEnd();

    sr.Close();
    fs.Close();

    return toReturn;
}

or to:

private static string GetString()
{
    FileStream fs;
    StreamReader sr;

    try
    {
        string toReturn = "";          

        fs = new FileStream("path", FileMode.Open)
        sr = new StreamReader(fs)

        toReturn = sr.ReadToEnd();

        sr.Close();
        fs.Close();

        return toReturn;
    }
    finally
    {
       if(sr != null)
           sr.Close();

       if(fs != null)
           fs.Close();
    }
}
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1  
How difficult is it to locate documentation on C#s using by using a search engine? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 29 '12 at 16:27
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/667111/… –  AJ. Sep 29 '12 at 16:28
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closed as too localized by Damien_The_Unbeliever, Florent, hochl, Filburt, pero Oct 1 '12 at 17:57

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code generated from a using statement is very similar to your second example (the biggest difference being that it calls IDisposable.Dispose instead of Close). It will always properly dispose of the objects, whether the method exits through a return or a thrown exception.

In case you're curious, this is the C# code without usings that compiles to the same IL as your example with usings:

private static string GetString()
{
    FileStream fs = new FileStream("path", FileMode.Open);
    try
    {
        StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fs);
        try
        {
            return sr.ReadToEnd();
        }
        finally
        {
            if (sr != null)
                ((IDisposable)sr).Dispose();
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (fs != null)
            ((IDisposable)fs).Dispose();
    }
}
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That's not how it compiles - the declaration is outside of the try, the assignment is inside (otherwise, there's no way to enter the try block with fs non-null, in which case why check for non-null in the finally. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 29 '12 at 16:37
    
I must disagree. I'm looking at each decompiled in ILSpy. ilspy.net The only differences are some nop operations (strange that there are any, I'm building in Release mode with VS2012; but that's beside the point). The non-null check is included because you could have done using (FileStream fs = null) or, more likely, using (var fs = GetSomething()), which could've returned null. –  Tim S. Sep 29 '12 at 16:40
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Take a look using statement:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02(v=vs.110).aspx

It should be equivalent to:

FileStream fs = null;

try
{
    fs = new FileStream("path", FileMode.Open);
    StreamReader sr = null;
    try
    {
        sr = new StreamReader(fs);
        toReturn = sr.ReadToEnd();
        return toReturn;
    }
    finally
    {
       if(sr != null)
           sr.Dispose();
    }
}
finally
{
    if(fs != null)
        fs.Dispose();
}

Inside Dispose method, it will call Close stream.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not how it compiles - the declaration is outside of the try, the assignment is inside (otherwise, there's no way to enter the try block with fs non-null, in which case why check for non-null in the finally. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 29 '12 at 16:37
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: that's correct –  Cuong Le Sep 29 '12 at 16:41
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If it implements IDisposable it will be closed properly when the using block is exited.

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