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I have a MYSQL 'activity' table where all activity by a user gets logged. Let's say that a user's activities can be either to ask a question or answer a question. So if a user asks a question, their question gets put into the 'question' table and also the activity gets put into the 'activity' table. Same thing if user provides an answer, except that the answer goes into the 'answers' table and the 'activity' table.

The question table's fields are:

q_id          question

The answers table's fields are:

a_id          q_id        answer

The activity table's fields are:

activity_id   q_id    user_id     action_type

(There are more columns then shown above, but these illustrate the point.)

What I want to be able to do is show a user's recent actions on the site, and actually show what the actions were.

My current MYSQL query simply joins the activity table with the question table as follows (using PDO):

"SELECT * 
FROM activity 
LEFT JOIN question ON activity.q_id = question.q_id 
WHERE activity.user_id = :user_id 
ORDER BY activity.a_id desc"  

This works okay, and can always give me the question for display in the activities list. However, if the activity that is returned is an answer, I would like to be able to show the answer as well. I tried just using a triple join as follows:

"SELECT * 
FROM activity 
LEFT JOIN question ON activity.q_id = question.q_id
LEFT JOIN answers ON activity.q_id = answers.q_id  
WHERE activity.user_id = :user_id 
ORDER BY activity.a_id desc"

But this just gives me a list of rows that is twice as long as the first query, and does not display the answers when the action_type was an answer.

I figure this should be possible, but the more I think about it I believe that maybe I should scrap the activity table and just perform the query directly on the question and answers tables with a UNION? Any opinions on this decision, and any thoughts on the queries?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use an outer join, which would return everything in the activity table, even if there isn't a corresponding row in the answer table:

SELECT *
FROM activity
LEFT JOIN question ON activity.q_id = question.q_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN answers ON activity.q_id = answers.q_id
WHERE activity.user_id = :user_id
ORDER BY activity.a_id desc

I'm assuming that for every q_id value in the activity table, there's always going to be one corresponding row in the question table.

To fix the problem with the duplicate answers, I'd add an a_id field to the activity table. For the question activity, you'd set it to NULL, and for each answer you'd set the a_id field to the appropriate a_id value to identify which answer goes with the activity. You'd then adjust the SQL above as follows:

SELECT *
FROM activity
LEFT JOIN question ON 
    activity.q_id = question.q_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN answers ON 
    activity.q_id = answers.q_id AND 
    activity.a_id = answers.a_id
WHERE activity.user_id = :user_id
ORDER BY activity.a_id desc
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't seem to want to work. It's returning way too many duplicates and mismatching answers and questions. Not sure why this is the case. Yes, every q_id in the activity will have a corresponding row in the question table, though not necessarily in the answer table. For each row to be displayed, it should be able to display first the activity type (question or answer), if its a question than it should display just the question, and if the type is an answer, it should be able to display the question and the answer as well. –  Cbomb Sep 29 '12 at 18:31
    
I knew something was bothering me when I looked at that. The problem is that in the activity table, you only have the q_id field, so the database has no way of knowing which answer goes with which activity. It therefore brings back every answer for the question with every activity for the question. I'll edit my answer with how I'd fix the issue. –  Darius Makaitis Sep 30 '12 at 0:59
    
That worked perfectly on my small scale test with just a few rows. Tomorrow I will apply it to my full database and hopefully it will still work. Should have realized the issue with the answers not knowing where to go. –  Cbomb Sep 30 '12 at 4:18
    
Yep, it works as is on my full database. Great, thanks for the help. –  Cbomb Sep 30 '12 at 17:52

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