Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Lets say I have stream data from the Twitter API, and I have the data stored as documents in the MongoDB. What I'm trying to find is the count of screen_name under entities.user_mentions.

{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50657d5844956d06fb5b36c7"),
    "contributors" : null,
    "text" : "",
    "entities" : {
        "urls" : [ ],
        "hashtags" : [
            {
                "text" : "",
                "indices" : [
                    26,
                    30
                ]
            },
            {
                "text" : "",
                "indices" : []
            }
        ],
        "user_mentions" : [ 
                {
                    "name":"Twitter API", 
                    "indices":[4,15], 
                    "screen_name":"twitterapi", 
                    "id":6253282, "id_str":"6253282"
                }]
    },
    ...

I have attempted to use map reduce:

map = function() {
    if (!this.entities.user_mentions.screen_name) {
        return;
    }

    for (index in this.entities.user_mentions.screen_name) {
        emit(this.entities.user_mentions.screen_name[index], 1);
    }
}

reduce = function(previous, current) {
    var count = 0;

    for (index in current) {
        count += current[index];
    }

    return count;
}

result = db.runCommand({
    "mapreduce" : "twitter_sample",
    "map" : map,
    "reduce" : reduce,
    "out" : "user_mentions"
});

But its not quite working...

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since entities.user_mentions is an array, you want to emit a value for each screen_name in the map():

var map = function() {
    this.entities.user_mentions.forEach(function(mention) {
        emit(mention.screen_name, { count: 1 });
    })
};

Then count the values by unique screen_name in the reduce():

var reduce = function(key, values) {
    // NB: reduce() uses same format as results emitted by map()
    var result = { count: 0 };

    values.forEach(function(value) {
        result.count += value.count;
    });

    return result;
};

Note: to debug your map/reduce JavaScript functions, you can use print() and printjson() commands. The output will appear in your mongod log.

EDIT: For comparison, here is an example using the new Aggregation Framework in MongoDB 2.2:

db.twitter_sample.aggregate(
    // Project to limit the document fields included
    { $project: {
        _id: 0,
        "entities.user_mentions" : 1
    }},

    // Split user_mentions array into a stream of documents
    { $unwind: "$entities.user_mentions" },

    // Group and count the unique mentions by screen_name
    { $group : {
        _id: "$entities.user_mentions.screen_name",
        count: { $sum : 1 }
    }},

    // Optional: sort by count, descending
    { $sort : {
        "count" : -1
    }}
)

The original Map/Reduce approach is best suited for a large data set, as is implied with Twitter data. For a comparison of Map/Reduce vs Aggregation Framework limitations see the related discussion on the StackOverflow question MongoDB group(), $group and MapReduce.

share|improve this answer
    
Hats off to you sir. I was wondering can I do the same using the Aggregate Framework? group() function? –  chutsu Sep 30 '12 at 9:41
1  
@chutsu: You can do the same with the Aggregation Framework, but there are a few caveats such as the results being limited to inline at the moment, and to the maximum document size of 16Mb. It may also be possible to use the group() command, but this also has some limitations. For a comparison of the approaches and limitations see: MongoDB group(), $group and MapReduce. –  Stennie Sep 30 '12 at 10:24
1  
@chutsu: Added an example with the Aggregation Framework for you ;-) –  Stennie Sep 30 '12 at 10:33
    
Thanks Stennie :) –  chutsu Sep 30 '12 at 10:40
    
hmmm the aggregate version doesn't seem to return the same values as the map reduce version –  chutsu Oct 1 '12 at 12:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.