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I have recently observed in Java (while implementing a deep recursive function call), that the stack size for thread is more than the process. With this I mean, E.g. The thread could execute approx 30,000 recursive calls while the program without thread could only go to 10,000 recursive calls to the same function.

Can any one suggest why is it so?

For better understanding and context, Please try to run the Java code as it is and see the messages printout on the console....

package com.java.concept;

/**
 * This provides a mechanism to increase the call stack size, by starting the thread in the caller we can increase it
 * Result were 3 times higher
 */
public class DeepRecursionCallStack {
    private static int level = 0;

    public static long fact(int n) {
        level++;
        return n < 2 ? n : n * fact(n - 1);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Thread t = new Thread(null, null, "DeepRecursionCallStack", 1000000) {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    level = 0;
                    System.out.println(fact(1 << 15));
                } catch (StackOverflowError e) {
                    System.err.println("New thread : true recursion level was " + level);
                    System.err.println("New thread : reported recursion level was "
                            + e.getStackTrace().length);
                }
            }

        };
        t.start();
        t.join();

        try {
            level = 0;
            System.out.println(fact(1 << 15));
        } catch (StackOverflowError e) {
            System.err.println("Main code : true recursion level was " + level);
            System.err.println("Main code : reported recursion level was "
                    + e.getStackTrace().length);
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
3  
There's no such thing as a "program without thread". Execution only ever occurs within a thread. –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '12 at 17:28
    
I know that, but what I meant by thread here : Another thread than the Main thread –  Astric Star Sep 29 '12 at 17:32
1  
Then that's what you should have written - ideally along with a short but complete program demonstrating your claim. –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '12 at 17:33
    
Ok will do that soon ... –  Astric Star Sep 29 '12 at 17:36
1  
The term "process" does not have a fixed meaning -- the meaning varies with the environment. The most generic meaning is that the process is the container for the address space and authorizations of an executing application, while actual execution occurs in threads. By default the process has an initial thread, which is where execution begins and which may be the only thread a simple application ever uses. –  Hot Licks Sep 30 '12 at 1:35

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