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I have a function in which I fill an Array of Pointers with two Pointers:

Vertex* MacePiece::getPositionOffset(int aDirection){
// returns Plate at Position aParent.myPlates[0]
BasePlate** theGroundPlate = this->getPlates();

Vertex* theOffset[] = {0,0};
switch(aDirection){

        theOffset[0] = theGroundPlate[0]->getVertexAt(0); //A
        theOffset[1] = theGroundPlate[0]->getVertexAt(1); //B
        break;

}

return theOffset[0];

}

Next I am passing that pointer with the address of the first Element to Another function:

Vertex* theParentOffset = aParentPiece->getPositionOffset(aDirection);
theConnectingPiece->setPositionInMace(theParentOffset, aDirection); 

Here I am using the Elements pointed to as follows:

void MacePiece::setPositionInMace(Vertex* aOffset, int aDirection){
        // set groundplate position
    updateGroundPlatePositionByOffsetVertex(aOffset, aDirection);

}

void MacePiece::updateGroundPlatePositionByOffsetVertex(Vertex* aOffset, int aDirection) {
    BasePlate** thePlates = this->getPlates();

    // first update GroundPlate's Position

    Vertex* A = thePlates[0]->getVertexAt(0);
    Vertex* B = thePlates[0]->getVertexAt(1);
    Vertex* C = thePlates[0]->getVertexAt(2);
    Vertex* D = thePlates[0]->getVertexAt(3);

    switch(aDirection){

        case MOVE_NORTH:

            // still 3D thus 2D's y is 3D'z if camera is looking down Y

            // Two Sides are connecting thus Some Plate locations are identical

            // A.x defined by parent D.x
            A->position[0] = aOffset[1].position[0];
            // A.z defined by parent D.z
            A->position[2] = aOffset[1].position[2];

            //B.x defined by parent C.x
            B->position[0] = aOffset[0].position[0];
            //B.z defined by parent C.z
            B->position[2] = aOffset[0].position[2];

            // now set Opposit side (A->D, B->C), since moving north: 
            // x is the same
            // z is reduced by -1 because OpenGL's Z is reducing to far-pane
            D->position[0] = A->position[0];
            D->position[2] = A->position[2] - 1.0f;

            C->position[0] = B->position[0];
            C->position[2] = B->position[2] - 1.0f;

            break; 

Specifically this Part:

// A.x defined by parent D.x
                A->position[0] = aOffset[1].position[0];
                // A.z defined by parent D.z
                A->position[2] = aOffset[1].position[2];

                //B.x defined by parent C.x
                B->position[0] = aOffset[0].position[0];
                //B.z defined by parent C.z
                B->position[2] = aOffset[0].position[2];

aOffset[1] returns the same as aOffset[0]

When I pass a **pointer for the Array Pointing to every information are lost.

I am creating a kind of labyrinth and it just fails for one direction. What is wrong with passing that pointer? How do I get the Right elements pointed at in Offset[1] ?

Its so anoying.

Cheers Knut

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is in the first function. You are returning the first element of an array which is a pointer. I think your intention is to return the array of two elements so that index 0 and 1 access the pointers you assigned in the first function. There isn't a simple fix using your existing data structures. One solution would be to have the first function return an std::pair. Assign your two pointers into pair.first and pair .second, then it will be easy to access these values later.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you for you answer. I tried it returning it as Vertex** but then I lost the values somewhat later. I could not figure out, why they are disapearing. They have not been overwritten. It was the same interation of calls. but with ** instead. I'll change it again and see what happens –  knut Sep 30 '12 at 9:58
    
A Vertex** won't work as you would then be returning the address of the array which is a local variable. –  combinatorial Sep 30 '12 at 14:39
    
I just use the first Vertex now, and calculate the rest of them due to this one. :D –  knut Sep 30 '12 at 17:49

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