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Update: The original phrasing of this question was vague so i've modified it to better express what i'm asking.

Lets say I have two divs

<div class='button'>A</div>
<div class='button green-button'>A</div>

with the following styles:

div.button {
  /* define position,  size, etc ...*/
  color:#FBB
  background-color:#F00
}

div.button.green-button{
  color:#BFB
  background-color:#0F0
}

enter image description hereenter image description here

In this example it was easy to shift the hue of the first button from red to green by simply changing shifting the values of color and background-color by 1 digit. If I wanted to make a blue button I could do the same shift again for a 3rd button.

However, in the case where I don't want to shift completely from one color to the next its a bit trickier.

Additionally I want to color shift everything in the div, not just the background-color and color properties. So if I were to place and image in the div the colors of the image would get shifted as well.

Is this possible in CSS? If not can you do it in Javascript?

share|improve this question
4  
Nope, CSS doesn't support black magic. Or is there some logic (color math?) behind it? –  Prinzhorn Sep 29 '12 at 17:41
1  
What does "without specifying new values for color and background-color" mean? How do you want to specify the new color? –  user113215 Sep 29 '12 at 17:41
2  
@FelipeAls: I think the issue Abody97 is raising here is that each answer is solving a different problem as a different permutation of a single very very vague question (which is the definition of a "wild guess")... –  BoltClock Sep 29 '12 at 18:25
1  
@Abody97: I don't know about "reputation-seeking" (ironic coming from me, I know), but this is why we have close votes, you know... –  BoltClock Sep 29 '12 at 18:25
3  
nothing wrong with "reputation seeking". what else motivates people to answer questions? goodwill?! get real. you're lying to yourself if you think you're not answering questions to pad your rep and invariably corroborate the knowledge you've learned. "goodwill" is a byproduct ... –  xandercoded Sep 29 '12 at 18:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since everyone is posting wild guesses, I'll jump right into it.

You could achieve something using CSS filters (in your case hue-rotate)

Or the same using a CSS preprocessor like LESS.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be the closest to what the question is asking. –  BoltClock Sep 29 '12 at 18:28
    
I've updated my original question, and I think this might be what I'm looking for, –  slayton Sep 29 '12 at 22:43
    
Note that SVG/CSS filters haven't been widely implemented yet. –  BoltClock Sep 29 '12 at 22:59

Do you mean like this:

DEMO

HTML:

<a class="button">A</a>​

CSS:

.button{
    font-family:sans-serif;
    font-size: 80px;
    display:block;
    line-height:100px;
    text-align:center;
    color:rgba(255,255,255,0.5);
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    background-color:green;
}

.button:hover{
    background-color:red;
}
​

Or are you looking for something that figures out the color offset on it's own?

If you are there is CSS3's filter: hue-rotate(angle);

DEMO

HTML:

<a class="button">A</a>​

CSS:

.button{
    font-family:sans-serif;
    font-size: 80px;
    display:block;
    line-height:100px;
    text-align:center;
    color:rgba(255,255,255,0.5);
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    background-color:green;
}

.button:hover{
    -webkit-filter:hue-rotate(250deg);
    -moz-filter:hue-rotate(250deg);
    -ms-filter:hue-rotate(250deg);
    filter:hue-rotate(250deg);
}
​
share|improve this answer
    
"without specifying new values for [...] background-color" –  Prinzhorn Sep 29 '12 at 17:52
    
You omitted a logically important word: "and" –  Lucas Green Sep 29 '12 at 17:54
1  
@LucasGreen Are you serious? –  Chris Sep 29 '12 at 17:55
    
@Prinzhorn if he had said: "without specifying new values for color OR background-color?" the complaint would make sense, but he said: "without specifying new values for color AND background-color?" –  Lucas Green Sep 29 '12 at 17:58
    
@LucasGreen What do you mean? color changes the text's color, and you're not changing the text's color, so where's the surprise there? –  Chris Sep 29 '12 at 18:00

Yeah, you'll need multiple elements though.

HTML:

<div>
    <span class="over-bg"></span>
    <span>A</span>
</div>​

CSS:

div, span { height:100px; width:100px; vertical-align:middle;
            text-align:center; }

div { background-color:#ff3300; position:relative; margin:20px; float:left; }
span { position:absolute; left:0; top:0; height:100%; width:100% }
span.over-bg { background-color:#22FF00; display:none; }
div:hover span.over-bg { display:block; }

http://jsfiddle.net/TeCvr/1/


Another approach using pseudo-elements:

HTML:

<div>
    <span>A</span>
</div>​

CSS:

div, span { height:100px; width:100px; vertical-align:middle;
            text-align:center; }

div { background-color:#ff3300; position:relative; margin:20px; float:left; }
span { position:absolute; left:0; top:0; height:100%; width:100% }
div:hover:before { display:block; content:""; position:absolute; left:0;
                   top:0; height:100%; width:100%; background-color:#22FF00; }

http://jsfiddle.net/TeCvr/2/

share|improve this answer
    
without specifying new values for color and background-color -- so just because the background-color values are pre-defined (not applied on :hover), they're considered not to be new? I don't know if that makes sense. –  Chris Sep 29 '12 at 17:57
    
this example fulfills the requirement of "Is is possible using CSS to change the div to look like this, without specifying new values for color and background-color?", in that it doesn't modify the background-color or color of the div. –  xandercoded Sep 29 '12 at 18:09
    
@Xander Hmm, good point. Sorry then! –  Chris Sep 29 '12 at 18:19
    
I've updated my original question, sorry it was vague –  slayton Sep 29 '12 at 22:42

Well you could use CSS3 supported transition style rules like:

   .button:hover {
     background-color: #F0F0F0;
     -webkit-transition: background-color 1ms linear;
     -moz-transition: background-color 1ms linear;
     -o-transition: background-color 1ms linear;
     -ms-transition: background-color 1ms linear;
     transition: background-color 1ms linear; 
}

Is there any specific reason as to why you would like to achieve this..? I can't think of any application as such; unless you came across this while reverse engineering a design and couldn't find the CSS that caused this behaviour..?

Reference: http://www.css3.info/preview/css3-transitions/

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated my original question, sorry it was vague –  slayton Sep 29 '12 at 22:43
    
@slayton Hey I see you hv updated your questions and now it has been closed too :p .. well anyways.. You can have the CSS and/or JS shift the background/text colors as per your algo (which is not clear from your question); and you could use HTML5+JS to change the Hue of images as well.. –  Kent Pawar Sep 30 '12 at 12:48

I don't know if i understand you. You can change the class of the div. For example .button to .buttongreen with diferent properties.

share|improve this answer
    
Probably not what the OP is looking for (fairly trivial), but, since the question is so vague -- you never know! –  Chris Sep 29 '12 at 17:48
    
Perhaps is some reason to not be able to use the new class :-? –  Kedume Sep 29 '12 at 17:51

Without using color and background-color properties, you can still use:

    background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #006e2e 0%,#006e2e 100%)

That's a gradient from a given color to the same color but the whole gradient is not a color in CSS.

share|improve this answer
2  
I just don't get the point. –  Chris Sep 29 '12 at 17:45
    
That's a correct answer to the constraints given by OP. Go figure why he has such constraints... –  FelipeAls Sep 29 '12 at 17:48
    
Well, yes, it meets the constraints if you're going to handle the question literally. I personally suspect he/she mis-phrased his/her question. What kind of case allows using linear gradients but not background colors? Not a normal, sensible case for sure. –  Chris Sep 29 '12 at 17:50
    
How could I guess that without proposing the answer in the first place? OP will tell me if he can or can't change background-image and if not will update his question. –  FelipeAls Sep 29 '12 at 17:55

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