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I've been reading about the new async and await operators in C# and tried to figure out in which circumstances they would possibly be useful to me. I studied several MSDN articles and here's what I read between the lines:

You can use async for Windows Forms and WPF event handlers, so they can perform lengthy tasks without blocking the UI thread while the bulk of the operation is being executed.

async void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // even though this call takes a while, the UI thread will not block
    // while it is executing, therefore allowing further event handlers to
    // be invoked.
    await SomeLengthyOperationAsync();
}

A method using await must be async, which means that the usage of any async function somewhere in your code ultimately forces all methods in the calling sequence from the UI event handlers up until the lowest-level async method to be async as well.

In other words, if you create a thread with an ordinary good old ThreadStart entry point (or a Console application with good old static int Main(string[] args)), then you cannot use async and await because at one point you would have to use await, and make the method that uses it async, and hence in the calling method you also have to use await and make that one async and so on. But once you reach the thread entry point (or Main()), there's no caller to which an await would yield control to.

So basically you cannot use async and await without having a GUI that uses the standard WinForms and WPF message loop. I guess all that makes indeed sense, since MSDN states that async programming does not mean multithreading, but using the UI thread's spare time instead; when using a console application or a thread with a user defined entry point, multithreading would be necessary to perform asynchronous operations (if not using a compatible message loop).

My question is, are these assumptions accurate?

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1  
+1 for a good question, even if it's completely misinterpreted the documentation :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '12 at 17:50
    
See some non GUI examples here –  Zaid Masud Sep 29 '12 at 19:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, it has a lot of uses server-side.

I really recommend this video: http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/Mads-Torgersen-Inside-C-Async by Mads Torgersen who is part of the team that develops the C# compiler. I found it very instructive.

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Could you explain in more detail what does the video say about server-side use of async-await? –  svick Sep 30 '12 at 7:40
    
I'm marking this one as the correct answer because you have the fewest reputation. That should be a mandatory instructional video; especially the parts where he talks about SynchronizationContext.Current are invaluable. –  dialer Sep 30 '12 at 15:48
1  
@dialer - cheers mate; it isn't every day you get an accepted answer over Mr Skeet! –  briantyler Oct 1 '12 at 10:23

So basically you cannot use async and await without having a GUI that uses the standard WinForms and WPF message loop.

That's absolutely not the case.

In Windows Forms and WPF, async/await has the handy property of coming back to the UI thread when the asynchronous operation you were awaiting has completed, but that doesn't mean that's the only purpose to it.

If an asynchronous method executes on a thread-pool thread - e.g. in a web service - then the continuation (the rest of the asynchronous method) will simply execute in any thread-pool thread, with the context (security etc) preserved appropriately. This is still really useful for keeping the number of threads down.

For example, suppose you have a high traffic web service which mostly proxies requests to other web services. It spends most of its time waiting for other things, whether that's due to network traffic or genuine time at another service (e.g. a datbase). You shouldn't need lots of threads for that - but with blocking calls, you naturally end up with a thread per request. With async/await, you'd end up with very few threads, because very few requests would actually need any work performed for them at any one point in time, even if there were a lot of requests "in flight".

The trouble is that async/await is most easily demonstrated with UI code, because everyone knows the pain of either using background threads properly or doing too much work in the UI thread. That doesn't mean it's the only place the feature is useful though - far from it.

Various server-side technologies (MVC and WCF for example) already have support for asynchronous methods, and I'd expect others to follow suit.

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Now that I've read all answers, I think I know where I went wrong. What I got right is that it's basically regular callback-based programming, but with better code. I assumed the await magic uses something strictly GUI-related to know where to invoke the callback (i.e. the remainder of the method after the await), when instead it uses SynchronizationContext.Current, TaskScheduler.Current, and "anything the OS deems appropriate" e.g. the ThreadPool, prioritized in that order. Unfortunately I'm that kind of person who's not comfortable using something I couldn't program myself. –  dialer Sep 30 '12 at 15:46
1  
@dialer: There's nothing wrong with wanting to peer behind the magic. You may like my Eduasync blog series: msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/tags/Eduasync/default.aspx –  Jon Skeet Sep 30 '12 at 17:54

A method using await must be async, which means that the usage of any async function somewhere in your code ultimately forces all methods in the calling sequence from the UI event handlers up until the lowest-level async method to be async as well.

Not true - methods marked async just mean they can use await, but callers of those methods have no restrictions. If the method returns Task or Task then they can use ContinueWith or anything else you could do with tasks in 4.0

A good non-UI example is MVC4 AsyncController.

Ultimately, async/await is mostly about getting the compiler rewriting so you can write what looks like synchronous code and avoid all the callbacks like you had to do before async/await was added. It also helps with the SynchronizationContext handling, useful for scenarios with thread affinity (UI frameworks, ASP.NET), but even without those, it's still useful. Main can always do DoStuffAsync().Wait(); for instance. :)

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My question is, are these assumptions accurate?

No.

You can use async for Windows Forms and WPF event handlers, so they can perform lengthy tasks without blocking the UI thread while the bulk of the operation is being executed.

True. Also true for other UI applications including Silverlight and Windows Store.

And also true for ASP.NET. In this case, it's the HTTP request thread that is not blocked.

A method using await must be async, which means that the usage of any async function somewhere in your code ultimately forces all methods in the calling sequence from the UI event handlers up until the lowest-level async method to be async as well.

This is a best practice ("async all the way down"), but it's not strictly required. You can block on the result of an asynchronous operation; many people choose to do this in Console applications.

an ordinary good old ThreadStart entry point

Well... I do have to take issue with "ordinary good old". As I explain on my blog, Thread is pretty much the worst option you have for doing background operations.

I recommend you review my introduction to async and await, and follow up with the async / await FAQ.

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