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I have created(by collecting some code snippets from internet) a console based LAN chat application. Now I want to

make a GUI using Netbeans IDE 7.1. It is a multi-threaded application. In my console based application,whenever i want to display output i do it by doing

System.out.println(msg) . 

Now I want done in the JFrame Form,

jTextField1.setText(msg). 

Do I need to create a new main class and put create an instance the JFrameForm and make it visible by making the call

new NewJFrame().setVisible(true); 

or I should do all the coding in the JFrame class itself. I present below my actual and working code(in console)

import java.io.DataInputStream;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;

public class MultiThreadChatClient implements Runnable {

  // The client socket
  private static Socket clientSocket = null;
  // The output stream
  private static PrintStream os = null;
  // The input stream
  private static DataInputStream is = null;

  private static BufferedReader inputLine = null;
  private static boolean closed = false;

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    // The default port.
    int portNumber = 2222;
    // The default host.
    String host = "127.0.0.1";

    if (args.length < 2) {
      System.out
          .println("Usage: java MultiThreadChatClient <host> <portNumber>\n"
              + "Now using host=" + host + ", portNumber=" + portNumber);
    } else {
      host = args[0];
      portNumber = Integer.valueOf(args[1]).intValue();
    }

    /*
     * Open a socket on a given host and port. Open input and output streams.
     */
    try {
      clientSocket = new Socket(host, portNumber);
      inputLine = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
      os = new PrintStream(clientSocket.getOutputStream());
      is = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
    } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
      System.err.println("Don't know about host " + host);
    } catch (IOException e) {
      System.err.println("Couldn't get I/O for the connection to the host "
          + host);
    }

    /*
     * If everything has been initialized then we want to write some data to the
     * socket we have opened a connection to on the port portNumber.
     */
    if (clientSocket != null && os != null && is != null) {
      try {

        /* Create a thread to read from the server. */
        new Thread(new MultiThreadChatClient()).start();
        while (!closed) {
          os.println(inputLine.readLine().trim());
        }
        /*
         * Close the output stream, close the input stream, close the socket.
         */
        os.close();
        is.close();
        clientSocket.close();
      } catch (IOException e) {
        System.err.println("IOException:  " + e);
      }
    }
  }

  /*
   * Create a thread to read from the server. (non-Javadoc)
   * 
   * @see java.lang.Runnable#run()
   */
  public void run() {
    /*
     * Keep on reading from the socket till we receive "Bye" from the
     * server. Once we received that then we want to break.
     */
    String responseLine;
    try {
      while ((responseLine = is.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(responseLine);
        if (responseLine.indexOf("*** Bye") != -1)
          break;
      }
      closed = true;
    } catch (IOException e) {
      System.err.println("IOException:  " + e);
    }
  }
}

//MultiThreadServer.java


import java.io.DataInputStream;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.ServerSocket;

/*
 * A chat server that delivers public and private messages.
 */
public class MultiThreadChatServer {

  // The server socket.
  private static ServerSocket serverSocket = null;
  // The client socket.
  private static Socket clientSocket = null;

  // This chat server can accept up to maxClientsCount clients' connections.
  private static final int maxClientsCount = 10;
  private static final clientThread[] threads = new clientThread[maxClientsCount];

  public static void main(String args[]) {

    // The default port number.
    int portNumber = 2222;
    if (args.length < 1) {
      System.out
          .println("Usage: java MultiThreadChatServer <portNumber>\n"
              + "Now using port number=" + portNumber);
    } else {
      portNumber = Integer.valueOf(args[0]).intValue();
    }

    /*
     * Open a server socket on the portNumber (default 2222). Note that we can
     * not choose a port less than 1023 if we are not privileged users (root).
     */
    try {
      serverSocket = new ServerSocket(portNumber);
    } catch (IOException e) {
      System.out.println(e);
    }

    /*
     * Create a client socket for each connection and pass it to a new client
     * thread.
     */
    while (true) {
      try {
        clientSocket = serverSocket.accept();
        int i = 0;
        for (i = 0; i < maxClientsCount; i++) {
          if (threads[i] == null) {
            (threads[i] = new clientThread(clientSocket, threads)).start();
            break;
          }
        }
        if (i == maxClientsCount) {
          PrintStream os = new PrintStream(clientSocket.getOutputStream());
          os.println("Server too busy. Try later.");
          os.close();
          clientSocket.close();
        }
      } catch (IOException e) {
        System.out.println(e);
      }
    }
  }
}

//ChatClient.java

/*
 * The chat client thread. This client thread opens the input and the output
 * streams for a particular client, ask the client's name, informs all the
 * clients connected to the server about the fact that a new client has joined
 * the chat room, and as long as it receive data, echos that data back to all
 * other clients. When a client leaves the chat room this thread informs also
 * all the clients about that and terminates.
 */
class clientThread extends Thread {

  private DataInputStream is = null;
  private PrintStream os = null;
  private Socket clientSocket = null;
  private final clientThread[] threads;
  private int maxClientsCount;

  public clientThread(Socket clientSocket, clientThread[] threads) {
    this.clientSocket = clientSocket;
    this.threads = threads;
    maxClientsCount = threads.length;
  }

  public void run() {
    int maxClientsCount = this.maxClientsCount;
    clientThread[] threads = this.threads;

    try {
      /*
       * Create input and output streams for this client.
       */
      is = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
      os = new PrintStream(clientSocket.getOutputStream());
      os.println("Enter your name.");
      String name = is.readLine().trim();
      os.println("Hello " + name
          + " to our chat room.\nTo leave enter /quit in a new line");
      for (int i = 0; i < maxClientsCount; i++) {
        if (threads[i] != null && threads[i] != this) {
          threads[i].os.println("*** A new user " + name
              + " entered the chat room !!! ***");
        }
      }
      while (true) {
        String line = is.readLine();
        if (line.startsWith("/quit")) {
          break;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < maxClientsCount; i++) {
          if (threads[i] != null) {
            threads[i].os.println("<" + name + "&gr; " + line);
          }
        }
      }
      for (int i = 0; i < maxClientsCount; i++) {
        if (threads[i] != null && threads[i] != this) {
          threads[i].os.println("*** The user " + name
              + " is leaving the chat room !!! ***");
        }
      }
      os.println("*** Bye " + name + " ***");

      /*
       * Clean up. Set the current thread variable to null so that a new client
       * could be accepted by the server.
       */
      for (int i = 0; i < maxClientsCount; i++) {
        if (threads[i] == this) {
          threads[i] = null;
        }
      }

      /*
       * Close the output stream, close the input stream, close the socket.
       */
      is.close();
      os.close();
      clientSocket.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
    }
  }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

While strictly not part of the original question, there are a lot of really important differences between a console app and a GUI app.

To start with, the thread model is different and is very important that you take the time to understand what and where and how to work with it.

First, DON'T ever do anything in the Event Dispatching Thread(aka EDT) (the main UI thread) that will block it, like, for example, IO operations...Where possible, do these in the background inside another thread or worker.

DO NOT, EVER, update a UI component from any thread OTHER then the EDT. SwingWorker can help in some of these cases, when it can't you need to rely on SwingUtilities.invokeLater/invokeAndWait

share|improve this answer

I am assuming Netbeans IDE to develop the application and not using Netbeans Platform. There is a DZone blog post about building a chat client. I think you need read swing based on your question. This blog post uses AWT, but its a good start for you.

http://www.javaworld.com/jw-01-1997/jw-01-chat.html

share|improve this answer

Java is an object-oriented language, so I think you should create a class like ChatFrame and this ChatFrame class should extend the JFrame class. (Or could have an instance of JFrame which is used in a method like "showChatFrame", thx to Hovercraft Full Of Eels for this point!)

So you can write every gui code in this ChatFrame class and do the server communication code in another class.

It is nice coding style to use strong modules. Your software should be a couple of modules which are communicating between each other through interfaces (not every time a real Java-Interface).

You Main class should only contains the main method and create for Example a ServerCommunication Object which does the communication and use the ChatFrame class to show the messages to the user.

share|improve this answer
3  
I agree that he should separate his concerns -- have a GUI or series of GUI "view" classes and have separate classes for the chatting mechanics, but a minor nitpick: I don't agree with having any of the GUI classes extend JFrame as there is usually no need to do this since it is very rare that we are going to alter the basic behavior of JFrame by overriding one of its methods. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 29 '12 at 20:11

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