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I'm creating a new Stack class for data storage, which uses my Array class as a data member. I'm still setting up constructors and having trouble with the assignment operator.

When I call my assignment operator, it is called continuously until I manually cancel the program.

Could you please help me find the mistake?

I can provide code for the Array class if necessary, but I think the bug should contained somewhere below.

Relevant code is as follows:

Stack Header Code:

#ifndef STACK_HPP
#define STACK_HPP

#include "Array_H.hpp"

namespace CLARK{
    namespace Containers{

        template <class Type=T> class Stack
        {
            private:
                int m_current;
                Array<Type> m_array;

            public:
            // constructors and destructors:
                Stack(); // default constructor
                // ...
                ~Stack(); // destructor

            // ...

            // modifiers:
                // overloaded operator functions:
                    Stack<Type>& operator = (const Stack<Type>& source); // assignment operator

        };    
    }
}

#ifndef STACK_CPP
#include "Stack.cpp"
#endif

#endif

Stack Source Code:

#ifndef STACK_CPP
#define STACK_CPP

#include "Stack_H.hpp"

namespace CLARK{
    namespace Containers{

        // constructors and destructors:
        template <class Type>
        Stack<Type>::Stack() : m_array(Array<Type>()) , m_current(0)
        { // default constructor
            cout << "Stack constructor call (default)" << endl;
        }

        // ...

        template <class Type>
        Stack<Type>::~Stack()
        { // destructor
            cout << "Stack destructor call" << endl;
        }

        // ...

        // modifiers:

        // overloaded operator functions:
        template <class Type>
        Stack<Type>& Stack<Type>::operator = (const Stack<Type>& source)
        {// assignment operator
            cout << "Stack assignment operator call" << endl;
            if (this == &source)
                return *this;

            this->Stack<Type>::operator = (source);
            m_current = source.m_current;
            m_array = source.m_array;

            return *this;
        }
    }
}

#endif STACK_CPP 

Test Code:

#include "Point_H.hpp"
#include "Line_H.hpp"
#include "Circle_H.hpp"
#include "Array_H.hpp"
#include "NumericArray_H.hpp"
#include "Stack_H.hpp"
#include "PointArray_H.hpp"
#include "ArrayException_H.hpp"
#include "OutOfBoundsException_H.hpp"

using namespace CLARK::Containers;
using namespace CLARK::CAD;

int main()
{ 

    try
    { 
        Stack<int> testStack; // test default constructor
        Stack<int> testStack2;

        testStack2 = testStack; // test assignment operator 

        return 0; 
    } catch(ArrayException& err) {
        cout << err.GetMessage() << endl;
    }
}

The output looks like:

Array constructor call (default)

Stack constructor call (default)

Array constructor call

Stack constructor call

Array constructor call (default)

Stack constructor call (default)

Stack assignment operator call

Stack assignment operator call

Stack assignment operator call

Stack assignment operator call

Stack assignment operator call

Stack assignment operator call

Stack assignment operator call [repeats infinitely, until I cancel it]

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The call to Stack<T>::operator=(source) calls the operator you are implementing. So you end up with an infinite recusion. It looks a bit as if you wanted to call the assignment operator of a base class but your Stack class template doesn't have a base class.

Since I noticed that you checked for self-assignment, please note that assignment operators doing a self-assignment check either make an unnecessary check or are not exception-safe.

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could you elaborate/explain the violation of exception safety? –  Walter Sep 29 '12 at 20:07
    
In the case above, the self-assignment check happens to be unnecessary, i.e., removing the check doesn't change the behavior. However, even here the code only achieves the basic guarantee while an assignment operator properly should yield the strong guarantee. In general, when the self-assignment check is needed, you start meddling with an object in a way that causes it to have self-assignment fail, e.g., deleting some resource. Recovering the original state if something goes wrong won't work in this case. Dealing with exception-safety generally makes self-assignment checkes unnecessary. –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 29 '12 at 20:17

You're calling the = operator recursively when you do:

this->Stack<Type>::operator = (source);

If you're trying to call a base operator, you should try:

base->operator=(source);
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