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I will use library in a huge project where exceptions are used for error handling. The library uses return codes for their error handling, meaning all functions will return a constant, defining if the function succeeded or any error happened.

Very often my functions have to abort if the library functions fail. Any better way to handle these errors than in the example implementation as given on the following snippet?

A main concern of my question is about deallocating previously allocated memory after each evaluation of the return code. This is fault-prone and cumbersome. I hope to find some guideline to prevent the deallocation at each call of the library functions...

void examplefunc()
{
  T* pT = new T();
  U* pU = new U();
  Q myQ;
  int iRes = CONST_SUCCESS;

  if ((iRes = myQ.func1())!= CONST_SUCCESS)
  {
    delete pU;
    delete pT;
    throw translateException(iRes);  // providing exc      
  }
  if ((iRes = mQ.func2())!= CONST_SUCCESS)
  {
    delete pU;
    delete pT;
    throw translateException(iRes);  // providing exc 
  }

  delete pU;
  delete pT;
  return;
}

Thank you for all advice. Are there any guidelines I could follow?

Best regards Sam

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Thanks for comments so far –  user1708818 Sep 29 '12 at 20:32
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6 Answers

Use smart pointers. E.g. instead of:

T* pT = new T();

you might use C++11's unique_ptr:

std::unique_ptr<T> pT = make_unique<T>();

unique_ptr provides automatic destruction of the internal pointer as soon as the wrapping object gets out of scope.

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Will be hard to mix up pointers and smart pointers in an existing project. –  user1708818 Sep 29 '12 at 20:43
1  
@user1708818 Well, depends on the complexity of the project and how carefully it was designed. Any pointer used internally by a function and never disclosed to the rest of the code can be safely translated in a smart pointer. If, instead, pointer types are used for object attributes or global references, it might not be so simple. Also, unique_ptr enriches the variable with the semantic of "pointer ownership", that is a good thing both from a design and documentation point of view. –  Marco Leogrande Sep 29 '12 at 20:50
    
There is no std::make_unique, although there probably should be. Herb Sutter provides a possible implementation: herbsutter.com/gotw/_102, obviously if you put this in your code then it should be somewhere other than namespace std, and if it's added to the standard in future then whatever namespace you put your version in, you can replace the definition in your namespace with using std::make_unique; and/or set about finding all the callers and moving them to use std instead. –  Steve Jessop Sep 30 '12 at 0:24
    
@SteveJessop Thanks, I stand corrected. –  Marco Leogrande Sep 30 '12 at 0:33
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You should create some sort of wrapper for the 3rd-party code. Best practice is to never use the 3rd party code directly, as if it changes you will be forced to perform many changes.

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Thank you for this real interesting comment. Of course a wrapper would cost a lot of time to implement. –  user1708818 Sep 29 '12 at 20:44
3  
You would probably find out that the time you spend in building the wrapper will ease you'er development later, it normally pays off. –  user1708860 Sep 29 '12 at 20:54
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For reference (in case you haven't seen it before), here's the C++11 version that uses smart pointers. It's equivalent to your code other than:

  • it doesn't leak pT in the case where new U() throws
  • likewise it doesn't leak if anything else throws (constructor of Q etc)
  • it destroys myQ before deleting pU and then pT, whereas your code deletes those first and then destroys myQ.

Typically the order of destruction doesn't matter, but it's something to be aware of in case it does matter. If you need to destroy your objects in anything other than reverse order of creation then their lifetimes can't be controlled simply by their scope.

void examplefunc()
{
    std::unique_ptr<T> pT(new T());
    std::unique_ptr<U> pU(new U());
    Q myQ;
    int iRes;

    if ((iRes = myQ.func1())!= CONST_SUCCESS)
    {
        throw translateException(iRes);  // providing exc
    }
    if ((iRes = mQ.func2())!= CONST_SUCCESS)
    {
        throw translateException(iRes);  // providing exc 
    }
    return;
}

I'm assuming of course that the T and U objects can't simply be placed on the stack -- you haven't shown why not, but the fact you're asking suggests there's a reason!

This code should not cause any issue at all with mixing raw and smart pointers between new and old code -- this function was previously responsible for freeing what it allocates, and it still is. If you need to pass a pointer to the T or U objects to some pre-existing code that takes a raw pointer:

  • without ownership, then pass pT.get()
  • with ownership (if this function isn't always responsible for deleting, because sometimes it passes or returns the pointer to someone else with that responsibility), then pass pT.release().

Then you can use smart pointers in more of your existing code as and when you like.

Finally, it's possible to write the above code in C++03 with std::auto_ptr, but you do have to be quite careful with auto_ptr, it's fairly easy to make mistakes with it. unique_ptr is "safer" but can't be fully implemented in C++03. boost::scoped_ptr is probably the best bet in C++03 if you don't need release().

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Why don't you make pT and pU smart pointers (std::auto_ptr in C++98 or std::unique_ptr in C++11), throw the errors when you detect them and let the smart pointers do their work on their destruction (that will take place on exception, too).

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I would not even suggest auto_ptr anymore. It's officially deprecated in favour of shared_ptr and unique_ptr. –  bstamour Sep 30 '12 at 23:05
    
@bstamour: I was just trying to offer a non C++11 solution (maybe this was not clear enough in the answer). –  Nobody Oct 1 '12 at 10:33
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Construct T and U on the stack instead of from the heap. Then they get deconstructed automatically. You should do this whenever you possibly can.

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If you don't want to repeat the same stuff over and over write a function that does:

void throwErrorAndCleanup(T* pT, U* pU, int iRes)
{
    delete pU;
    delete pT;
    throw translateException(iRes);
}

Another way to do this is with goto's. Using goto is a somewhat highly debated topic, however for error cleanup like this it often makes sense (in particular you may find that you need to cleanup more things as the function progresses, so you can create more jump targets that cleanup the extra stuff and then fall into the earlier cleanup).

void examplefunc()
{
  T* pT = new T();
  U* pU = new U();
  Q myQ;
  int iRes = CONST_SUCCESS;

  if ((iRes = myQ.func1())!= CONST_SUCCESS)
  {
    goto error;
  }
  if ((iRes = mQ.func2())!= CONST_SUCCESS)
  {
    goto error;
  }

  delete pU;
  delete pT;
  return;

  error:
  delete pU;
  delete pT;
  throw translateException(iRes);  // providing exc 
}
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4  
Please, no gotos! :-) Try a smart pointer instead. –  Bo Persson Sep 29 '12 at 20:21
    
Like I said, the use goto's are hotly debated ;) –  CrazyCasta Sep 29 '12 at 20:22
    
throwErrorAndCleanup(T* pT, U* pU, int iRes) might be nice for the example, but cannot be used in general of course... –  user1708818 Sep 29 '12 at 20:45
    
-1 because this is just poor advice. This isn't C, C++ provides better methods to manage resources –  Ed S. Sep 29 '12 at 20:51
1  
@CrazyCasta: I write C++ code every day, it's not commonly used in C++ nor should it be. It is trivial to create an RAII style wrapper for any sort of scope guided management you need to do, it doesn't have to be used solely for memory management.. There is absolutely no reason to use a goto here, I would suggest you read up a bit on more modern C++ practices. –  Ed S. Sep 29 '12 at 20:58
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