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I'm trying to learn how to create simple groovy classes, which are not domain classes. I want to create a set of classes (and their objects) in my software but have no intention of saving to a database. Specifically, I have a question about how to create a class which has a property that is a list of a second class. like this:

class oParent{
    def fName
    def lName
    def listOfChildren
}
class oChild{
    def propertyOne
    def propertyTwo
}

So, with this example, I can create an object of each like this:

def p = new oParent();
def cOne = new oChild();
def cTwo = new oChild();

p.fName ="SomeName"
p.lName ="some Last Name"

cOne.propertyOne = "a"
cOne.propertyTwo = "b"

cTwo.propertyOne = "c"
cTwo.propertyTwo = "d"

So, how do i add each of the children objects (cOne and cTwo) to the parent object p). Once added, how would i then traverse the parent class's children's property and, for example, print all the propertyTwo properties for all children classes?

share|improve this question
    
any particular reason for the down vote? –  jason Sep 29 '12 at 21:25
    
Maybe because of the weird class and instance names. Kind of a petty reason to downvote, but you never know. –  Kaleb Brasee Sep 30 '12 at 4:50

2 Answers 2

Here's a commented version of your code with some suggestions for changes:

// 1) Class names start with a Capital Letter
class Parent {

  // 2) If you know the type of something, use it rather than def
  String fName
  String lName

  // 3) better name and type
  List<Child> children = []

  // 4) A utility method for adding a child (as it is a standard operation)
  void addChild( Child c ) {
    children << c
  }

  // 5) A helper method so we can do `parent << child` as a shortcut
  Parent leftShift( Child c ) {
    addChild( c )
    this
  }

  // 6) Nice String representation of the object
  String toString() {
    "$fName, $lName $children"
  }
}

// See 1)
class Child{

  // See 2)
  String propertyOne
  String propertyTwo

  // See 6)
  String toString() {
    "($propertyOne $propertyTwo)"
  }
}

// Create the object and set its props in a single statement
Parent p = new Parent( fName: 'SomeName', lName:'some Last Name' )

// Same for the child objects
Child cOne = new Child( propertyOne: 'a', propertyTwo: 'b' )
Child cTwo = new Child( propertyOne: 'c', propertyTwo: 'd' )

// Add cOne and cTwo to p using the leftShift helper in (5) above
p << cOne << cTwo

// prints "SomeName, some Last Name [(a b), (c d)]"
println p

Then, you can do this:

println p.children.propertyTwo // prints "[b, d]"

Or this:

p.children.propertyTwo.each { println it } // prints b and d on separate lines

Or, indeed this:

p.children.each { println it.propertyTwo } // As above
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

well, it turned out to be pretty simple, unless i'm doing it wrong. here is how i did it:

class oParent{
   def fName
   def lName
   def listOfChildren = []
}

class oChild{
   def propertyOne
   def propertyTwo
}

def p = new oParent();
def cOne = new oChild();
def cTwo = new oChild();

p.fName ="SomeName"
p.lName ="some Last Name"

cOne.propertyOne = "a"
cOne.propertyTwo = "b"

cTwo.propertyOne = "c"
cTwo.propertyTwo = "d"

p.listOfChildren.add(cOne)
p.listOfChildren.add(cTwo)

I can the iterate like this:

p.listOfChildren.each{ foo->
    log.debug(foo.propertyOne)
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You are correct. It's more typical to name it children rather than listOfChildren, but the idea is the same. –  erturne Sep 29 '12 at 22:43
1  
It would also be more typical to give oParent (which would typically be named 'Parent'), an addChild method instead of accessing the parent's list directly. –  GreyBeardedGeek Sep 30 '12 at 2:40

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