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I have a static method that returns or creates an object if it doesn't exist. I'd like to find an elegant way to handle passing an ID argument to the object.

The logic here is that if an ID is passed, the object is created with that ID. If not, it's created with a default ID.

What I had was:

class App {
    private $game_obj;

    public static function get_game ($arguments) {
    if (!isset($this->game_obj))
            $this->game_obj = new Game ($arguments[0]);

    return $this->game_obj;
    }
}

class Game {
    private $gameID;

    public function __construct ($id=1) {
        $this=>gameID = $id;
        /* other code */
    }
}

When I call App::get_game(5) I get the result I expect. A Game object with a gameID of 5.

When I call App::get_game() I do not get the result I expect, which would be a Game object with a gameID of 1. Instead I get an error about undefined offset in the App::get_game ().

I updated App::get_game() as follows, but it seems particularly inelegant. I'd prefer to define the default ID in the class definition.

class App {
    private $game_obj;

    public static function get_game ($arguments) {
    if (!isset($this->game_obj)) {
            $default_id = 1; // I don't like having this here
            $id = isset ($arguments[0] ? $arguments[0] : $default_id;
            $this->game_obj = new Game ($id);
        }

    return $this->game_obj;
    }
}

Is there a simpler/better/more elegant way to handle this? Ideally one that would keep my default ID declaration in the Game class itself?

share|improve this question
    
You are passing in a scalar 5 but your method expects $arguments is an array. –  Michael Berkowski Sep 29 '12 at 21:06
    
I don't know if this is really any more elegant but you could move the ternary operation to the get_game static method so your above code we be as is, but when you create the Game object on line 5, you do something like this: $this->game_obj = new Game (isset($arguments[0]) ? $arguments[0] : 1); –  Gavin Sep 29 '12 at 22:09

2 Answers 2

did you try

public static function get_game ($arguments=null) {
if($arguments==null) //etc..

?

share|improve this answer

you can test with :

if(is_object($my_object)) {

    }
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