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I am writing a diagram editor application for state machine representation. I have two interaction tools that operate on the canvas and the diagram. The first one is called "Edit Tool" and is responsible for the creation of new diagram elements, such as nodes and edges. And the second one is called "Move Tool" and acts on the diagram layout, id est, it moves the nodes and updates the edges. It's simplified explanation but I don't need to give you more details to ask my question.

I want to know what is the most efficient and organized way to handle the events and distribute them across the tools

I know I can simply intercept the events on their call and make some processing according to the selected tool, current state and target object, but this way the code extends to a huge if (...) else if (...) blocks, context flags, etc; and becomes extremely difficult to maintain.

Are there any common code patterns for this kind of situations? Can you give some examples? What are the open source projects I can look at to learn more about it?

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2 Answers 2

I'm not completely sure if I got your question right. From reading the question it appears that you're looking for the observer design pattern. However, the answer you gave to your own question does not really fit in with that interpretation...

If you want e.g. that your UI updates every time the state machine is being altered, then you might want to have a look at the observer pattern at Wikipedia, CodeProject or just google for it. It's one of the most common design patterns and if you don't know it you should definitely spend a couple of minutes to familarize yourself with it.

As an example on how this pattern could be applied to your domain, let's say you want your LayoutManager to redraw the diagram whenever the user adds or removes nodes/edges with the Edit Tool. You don't want to call the LayoutManager directly from within the Edit Tool, because that would strongly couple these two components. You could therefore specify an observer interface as follows (I use C++ here, 'cause I don't know what language your application is written in):

class StateMachineModelObserver
{
public:
   virtual void nodeChanged(Node* n)=0;
   virtual void edgeChanged(Edge* e)=0;
};

Let any subject that wants to be notified about changes to the state machines model inherit from that class and implement its functions. E.g.:

class MyStateMachineLayoutManager : public StateMachineModelObserver
{
public:
   void foo() {} // these are 
   void bar() {} other functions of the layout manager

   virtual void nodeChanged(Node* n)
   {
      redraw();
   }

   virtual void edgeChanged(Edge* e)
   {
      redraw();
   }
};

Now you need your state machine model to offer functions that allow for subscribing to and unsubscribing from notifications and you need to send out the notifications.

class MyStateMachineModel
{
public:
   Node* addNode()
   {
      Node* n=new Node();
      insertNodeIntoModel();
      notify(n);
      return n;
   }

   void subscribe(StateMachineModelObserver* o)
   {
      m_mutex.lock();
      m_observers.insert(o);
      m_mutex.unlock();
   }

   void unsubscribe(StateMachineModelObserver* o)
   {
      m_mutex.lock();
      m_observers.insert(o);
      m_mutex.unlock();
   }

private:
   void notify(Node* n)
   {
      m_mutex.lock();
      for_each(m_observers.begin(), m_observers.end(),
         [](StateMachineModelObserver* o)
         {
            o->nodeChanged(n);
         }
      );
      m_mutex.unlock();
   }

   std::set<StateMachineModelObserver*> m_observers;
   std::mutex m_mutex;
};

Now all you have to do is to subscribe the LayoutManager to the state machine model and every time the model changes (here: a node is being added) it will get notified automatically. You can have different observer interfaces for different notifications or you can have a single observer interface with separate functions for the different kinds of notifications.

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I've just found a very good article describing a design of GUIs that can be manipulated with a State Machine: http://lassala.net/2008/02/05/state-machines-and-gui-interaction-part-i/

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