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I'm looking for an elegant way to parse court case captions which may have alias tokens such as "AKA" and "FKA". I need to retrieve the alias type as well as the following caption. I've brute forced a solution, but would like to see what other options there are. I like Linq and tried Sprache but couldn't quite wrap my head around it.

Example caption:
JOHN SMITH AKA JOHN R SMITH FKA JOHNNY R SMITH  

Desired output: 
Alias Type Found: AKA   
Alias Caption Found: JOHN R SMITH   
Alias Type Found: FKA   
Alias Caption Found: JOHNNY R SMITH

Following is what I've thrown together in LinqPad so far.

void Main()
{
    var caption = "JOHN SMITH AKA JOHN R SMITH FKA JOHNNY R SMITH";
    caption.Split().ParseAliases( (t,c)=>{
        Console.WriteLine ("Alias Type Found: {0}",t);
        Console.WriteLine ("Alias Caption Found: {0}",c);
    });
}

public delegate void AliasRetrievedDelegate(string aliasType, string aliasCaption);

public static class ParserExtensions{
    private static IEnumerable<string> aliasTypes = new[]{"AKA","FKA"};

    public static void ParseAliases(this IEnumerable<string> tokens, 
        aliasRetrievedDelegate d, 
        int startIdx = 0){
                   // TODO

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Sounds like a job for regular expressions rather than LINQ. –  Matthew Strawbridge Sep 29 '12 at 22:53
    
That was my first thought but I'd like a more readable solution, something along the lines of a mini DSL that can be extended more easily. –  Ken Sep 29 '12 at 23:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This might not be as elegant as you would like, but it works. It groups the alias types with the list of following strings. It then joins the strings to form the corresponding alias names.

public static class ParserExtensions
{
    private static IEnumerable<string> aliasTypes = new[]{"AKA","FKA"};

    public static void ParseAliases(this IEnumerable<string> tokens, 
        Action<string, string> d, 
        int startIdx = 0)
    {
        var aliases = tokens.Skip(startIdx)
                            .GroupMatchesWithTrailing(x => aliasTypes.Contains(x));
        foreach(var alias in aliases)
        {
            string aliasType = alias.Item1;
            string aliasName = string.Join(" ", alias.Item2.ToArray());
            d(alias.Type, alias.Name);
        }   
    }

The tricky part is grouping the alias types with the corresponding names. This method is quite verbose, but iterates source only once and can be evaluated lazily. There are more terse solutions, but they have tradeoffs.

    private static IEnumerable<Tuple<T, List<T>>> GroupMatchesWithTrailing<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Func<T, bool> predicate)
    {
        var items = source.SkipWhile(x => predicate(x) == false);
        using (IEnumerator<T> iterator = items.GetEnumerator())
        {
            bool hasItems = iterator.MoveNext();
            while(hasItems)
            {
                T match = iterator.Current;
                List<T> trailing = new List<T>();
                hasItems = iterator.MoveNext();
                while(hasItems && predicate(iterator.Current) == false)
                {
                    trailing.Add(iterator.Current);
                    hasItems = iterator.MoveNext();
                }
                yield return Tuple.Create(match, trailing);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, never noticed Tuple had a factory method. Not quite what I was hoping for, but it does work, and I am now reading Domain-Specific Languages for future simplification. –  Ken Oct 1 '12 at 13:53

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