Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I created a multiple toggle for a number of links in the same page. They are all closed (with a plus sign) and on click each of them will open a div (and will show a minus sign).

I could get the toggle to work but I'm stuck with the plus and minus signs. When one link is open all the links will show the minus sign.

Each a has an id with a number from 1 to 15.

How do we get only the one opened to show the minus sign and all the others the plus sign?

Please advice

Here the code used:

$('.questions a').removeClass('DownArrow');
$('.questions a').addClass('RightArrow');  

function toggleDiv(divId) {
    $("#"+divId).toggle();
    $('.questions a').toggleClass('DownArrow');
    $('.questions a').toggleClass('RightArrow');
}

HTML:

<div class='questions'> 
    <a class="DownArrow" id="numb-1" href="javascript:toggleDiv('myContent1');">text</a>
</div>
<div id="myContent1">
    <p>some text</p>
</div>
<div class='questions'> 
    <a class="DownArrow" id="numb-2" href="javascript:toggleDiv('myContent2');">text</a>
</div>
<div id="myContent2">
    <p>some text</p>
</div>                               

Here the CSS:

div#questions  a {  
    display:block; border:1px solid #F00; width:500px; padding:10px; 
}

div#myContent1,div#myContent2,div#myContent3,div#myContent4,div#myContent5 {
    display:none;
}

a.DownArrow {
    background:#ccc url(../images/plus.png) no-repeat 460px 8px;
}

a.RightArrow {
    background:#ccc url(../images/minus.png) no-repeat 460px 8px;
}                            
share|improve this question
1  
Anytime you see something like myAwesomeThing#++ hardcoded in your code, just know you've got some refactoring to do. –  Jared Farrish Sep 29 '12 at 23:04

4 Answers 4

This is a lot easier if you use evnet handlers instead of inline onclick assignments... You can just use the href on the acnchors to target:

Revised Markup

<div class='questions'> 
  <a class="DownArrow" id="numb-1" href="#myContent1">text</a>
</div>
<div id="myContent1">
  <p>some text</p>
</div>
<div class='questions'> 
  <a class="DownArrow" id="numb-2" href="#myContent2">text</a>
</div>
<div id="myContent2">
  <p>some text</p>
</div>

JS

$(function (){
   $('div.questions a').click(function (e){
        var $a = $(this),
            target = $a.attr('href');

        // toggle the classes on the a clicked
        $a.toggleClass('DownArrow RightArrow');

        $(target).toggle(); // show the DIV  
   });
});

Here is a Fiddle

share|improve this answer
1  
I had a similar thought, only in the situation the related .content is $.next() to the .question. –  Jared Farrish Sep 29 '12 at 23:47
    
@Jared: Yeah i try to stay away from depending on traversal because often times things change. The only thing i like to depend upon structure for is context. +1 on your answer though you totally went the extra mile haha –  prodigitalson Sep 30 '12 at 0:47

This is a little different than what you've shown, but stick with me here.

If the content opens like an accordion/collapsing content list style configuration, you actually don't need all of the cruft with ids and whatnot. That's the wonder of jQuery: It puts traversals right at your fingertips.

So this is actually really easy:

<div class="questions">
    <span>+</span>
    <a href="#">text</a>
</div>
<div class="content">
    <p>some text</p>
</div>
<div class='questions'> 
    <span>+</span>
    <a href="#">text</a>
</div>
<div class="content">
    <p>some text</p>
</div>

Note, I'm not demonstrating all of the crazy ids, and I've implemented a content class. In my examples I'm using a <span>+</span> instead of an image for the toggle arrows, too, but that's just because I didn't think it was necessary to demonstrate that. Let me know if you want me to explain that.

The only relevant part of the CSS:

.content {
    display: none;
}

And here we have the (very, very simple) jQuery:

jQuery(function load(){
    var $questions = $('.questions'),
        $content = $('.content');

    $questions.on('click', function toggle(){
        var $this = $(this),
            $selected = $this.next('.content');

        $content.not($selected).hide();

        $selected.show();

        $questions.not(this).find('span').text('+');
        $this.find('span').text('-');

        return false;
    });
});​

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/5t2Un/

So what I've done is...

// jQuery(); is a shortcut to $(document).ready()
jQuery(function load(){
    // I'm going to cache my elements for later.
    // I can also use $() inside this function.
    var $questions = $('.questions'),
        $content = $('.content');

    // Here I'm going to detect a click on a `div.questions`,
    // and use this as my toggle.
    $questions.on('click', function toggle(){
        var $this = $(this),
            // Notice I'm using `$.next('.content'). This is
            // how I select the appropriate `.content` for the
            // question.
            $selected = $this.next('.content');

        // Hide all content but what was selected by $.next()
        $content.not($selected).hide();

        // Now show the $this.next('.content'), which we've
        // saved a reference to $selected.
        $selected.show();

        // Toggling the + and -. You can do an $.addClass()
        // and $.removeClass() on the element here.
        $questions.not(this).find('span').text('+');
        $this.find('span').text('-');

        // Return false in case an ANCHOR was clicked, which 
        // will cancel any navigation.
        return false;
    });
});​

EDIT

Now, if the .questions aren't $.next() to their related .content (and traversal is counter-productive), you can also use a reference within some part of the element. Prodigitalson demonstrated using href="#myContent1", which he fed to jQuery like $(this.href) to select the current .content by id.

I'll demonstrate another method, using the data- format.

<div class="container nav-bar">
    <div class="questions" data-content-id="#myContent1">
        <span>+</span>
        <a href="#">text</a>
    </div>
    <div class='questions' data-content-id="#myContent2"> 
        <span>+</span>
        <a href="#">text</a>
    </div>
    <div class='questions' data-content-id="#myContent3"> 
        <span>+</span>
        <a href="#">text</a>
    </div>
    <div class='questions' data-content-id="#myContent4"> 
        <span>+</span>
        <a href="#">text</a>
    </div>
    <div class='questions' data-content-id="#myContent5"> 
        <span>+</span>
        <a href="#">text</a>
    </div>
</div>

Notice this part:

<div class="questions" data-content-id="#myContent1">

Now I'll use that utilizing $.data():

$(function load() {
    var $questions = $('.questions'),
        $content = $('.content');

    $questions.on('click', function toggle() {
        var $this = $(this),
            $selected = $($this.data('content-id'));

        $content.not($selected).hide();
        $selected.show();

        $questions.not(this).find('span').text('+');
        $this.find('span').text('-');

        return false;
    });
});​

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/VCnQn/

This is essentially the same method as I showed previously, except:

$selected = $($this.data('content-id'));

Which is how we make the association between .questions and .content. Easy enough.

share|improve this answer

use this

var id=0;
while(condition){
    $("#myContent"+id).toggle();
    $('.questions a').toggleClass('DownArrow');
    $('.questions a').toggleClass('RightArrow');
    id++;
}
share|improve this answer
$('questions a').each(function(){
 $(this).click(function () {
   var clicked_id = $(this).attr('id');
    //*****
    $('questions a').each(function(){ 
     if ($(this).attr('id') == clicked_id ) {$(this).attr('class', 'class_with_sign_-'); }
     else {$(this).attr('class', 'class_with_sign_+');}
     });
    //*****
 });
});
share|improve this answer
    
the .each() here is unnecessary -- you can just do $('.questions a').click(...). Also, your answer uses questions and should use .questions. –  rmurphey Sep 30 '12 at 0:12
    
yes I forgot .questions, but the .each() is necessary because $(.question) takes into account only the first element –  chokrijobs Sep 30 '12 at 11:13
    
I'm still not clear why the outer .each() is required -- simply doing $('.questions a').click(...) would bind the click to all elements that match the $('.questions a') selection, not just to the first one. Furthermore, what you're doing here could be accomplished using .siblings(), and the second .each() could be avoided as well. –  rmurphey Oct 1 '12 at 1:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.