Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Good day everyone.

I need your skills with g++ to understand what's happening to me !

When trying to link, g++ tells me this:

undefined reference to `bool Script::Call<bool>(asIScriptFunction*, std::string, ...)'

Whereas that function is clearly defined in that file:

namespace Script
{
  template<typename RET>
  RET Call(asIScriptFunction* function, string fmt, ...)
  {
    asIScriptContext* context = Script::Engine::Get()->CreateContext();
    va_list ap;

    context->Prepare(function);
    va_start(ap, fmt);
    for (unsigned short i = 0 ; fmt[i] ; ++i)
    {
      if (i == 'O')
    context->SetArgObject(i, va_arg(ap, void*));
      else if (i == 'b')
    context->SetArgByte(i, va_arg(ap, int));
      else if (i == 'i')
    context->SetArgDWord(i, va_arg(ap, int));
      else if (i == 'f')
    context->SetArgFloat(i, va_arg(ap, double));
    }
    va_end(ap);
    context->Execute();

    RET to_ret = ScriptCallGetReturn<RET>(context);
    context->Release();
    return (to_ret);
  }
}

namespace Script
{
  template<> bool  Call<bool> (asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);
  template<> int   Call<int>  (asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);
  template<> float Call<float>(asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);
  template<> void* Call<void*>(asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);

  template<>
  void Call<void>(asIScriptFunction* function, string fmt, ...)
  {
    asIScriptContext* context = Script::Engine::Get()->CreateContext();
    va_list ap;

    context->Prepare(function);
    va_start(ap, fmt);
    for (unsigned short i = 0 ; fmt[i] ; ++i)
    {
      switch (fmt[i])
      {
    case '0':
      context->SetArgObject(i, va_arg(ap, void*));
      break ;
    case 'b':
      context->SetArgByte(i, va_arg(ap, int));
      break ;
    case 'i':
      context->SetArgDWord(i, va_arg(ap, int));
      break ;
    case 'f':
      context->SetArgFloat(i, va_arg(ap, double));
      break ;
      }
    }
    va_end(ap);
    context->Execute();
    context->Release();
  }
}

And indeed, these templates should be compiled (they're literally in the same file that uses them). What could be the reason for this to happen ? Could it be because of my use of stdarg ?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

template<> bool Call (asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);

This is not doing what you think it is doing. This is declaring a full template specialization of template <typename RET> Call with RET <- bool. You haven't defined it, and that old definition is out the door. Function template specialization is a weird beast, something probably best avoided.

What you are trying to do, I think, is to tell the compiler that you will be using an instantiation of Call. You don't need to do that. Just use it.

bool variable_name = Call<bool> (some_script, other_args);
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, quite right indeed ! It works ! Thanks ! –  Michael Sep 30 '12 at 0:05
add comment

The function is declared but it is not implemented there. The linker is looking for the implementation. Notice that only Call<void> is implemented in the code you supplied but Call<bool> is'nt.

All you have to do for you'er code to be linked properly is remove the declarations:

  template<> bool  Call<bool> (asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);
  template<> int   Call<int>  (asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);
  template<> float Call<float>(asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);
  template<> void* Call<void*>(asIScriptFunction*, string fml, ...);
share|improve this answer
    
Holy cow. I forgot half the code -_-... that specialization isn't even relevant here... –  Michael Sep 29 '12 at 23:42
    
@user626921 Call<bool> (as well as Call<int> and Call<float>) is still (after your unmarked edit) not defined (implemented), but only declared... –  Walter Sep 29 '12 at 23:47
    
Doesn't it mean that I can't use template for this ? If I have to implement it, then I have to do so for every type, don't I ? And doing so I end up doing the same amount of work than without template. –  Michael Sep 29 '12 at 23:50
    
So yeah. It does mean I can't use templates... it works if I implement them, but then I have to copy-paste the code 4 times. It's disappointing and I hate it but I'm gonna have to use a macro. Thanks for the help. –  Michael Sep 29 '12 at 23:57
    
@user626921 - You do not have to cut-and-paste the code four times. That's one of the key points of templates. –  David Hammen Sep 29 '12 at 23:59
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.