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Say, I have the following SQL Server 2008 table with data:

CREATE TABLE tbl (dtIn DATETIME2, dtOut DATETIME2)
INSERT tbl VALUES
('9/10/2012 5:14:10 AM', '9/10/2012 5:15:09 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:16:12 AM', '9/10/2012 5:18:12 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:18:43 AM', '9/10/2012 5:23:04 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:25:17 AM', '9/10/2012 5:26:05 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:26:57 AM', '9/10/2012 5:29:19 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:31:41 AM', '9/10/2012 5:32:41 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:33:16 AM', '9/10/2012 5:34:08 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:35:25 AM', '9/10/2012 5:49:46 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:55:35 AM', '9/10/2012 5:56:48 AM'),
('9/10/2012 5:58:54 AM', '9/10/2012 5:59:59 AM')

and then I ran this query:

WITH ctx AS(
  SELECT datediff(minute, dtIn, dtOut) AS d FROM tbl
  )
SELECT SUM(d) FROM ctx

I get 30 minutes.

But when I try the same with C#:

double fM = 0;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:15:09 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:14:10 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:18:12 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:16:12 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:23:04 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:18:43 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:26:05 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:25:17 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:29:19 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:26:57 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:32:41 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:31:41 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:34:08 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:33:16 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:49:46 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:35:25 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:56:48 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:55:35 AM")).TotalMinutes;
fM += (DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:59:59 AM") - DateTime.Parse("9/10/2012 5:58:54 AM")).TotalMinutes;

I get fM = 29.016666666666669.

By adding Math.Round() to each C# statement, I get 28.0. By adding Math.Floor() I get 25.0. By adding Math.Ceiling I get 33.0.

Can someone explain this discrepancy?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The return value of each is measuring different things.

It would be prudent to pay attention to the DATEDIFF docs here:

Returns the count (signed integer) of the specified datepart boundaries crossed between the specified startdate and enddate.

which leads to the following 2 second interval:

SELECT datediff(minute, '9/10/2012 5:14:59 AM', '9/10/2012 5:15:01 AM') 

returning 1 because it crosses a minute boundary. I suspect that you did not take this behaviour into account.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But that sounds weird. Wouldn't rounding produce a smaller value in t-SQL? I tried adding Math.Round() to c# code and got 28 instead of 30. –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 0:35
    
@user843732 I won't answer this until you ensure that the two calculations are the same. I can see discrepancies between the SQL and the c# on the last line of each. Are there more? –  spender Sep 30 '12 at 0:42
    
Sorry. Corrected it. –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 0:47
    
There you go then... ;) –  spender Sep 30 '12 at 0:50
    
Thanks, I see now. It does its own rounding there. Hmm. That's an interesting way to program it... Just from curiosity, why did they make it count as such? Is it some sort of efficiency/speed thing? –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 0:54

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