Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I taught myself Java and for reasons I can't remember I've always written brackets as

void method()
{
    if(true)
    {
        //code
    }
    else
    {
        //code
    }
}

When all the examples I see are

void method(){
    if(true){
        //code
    }else{
        //code
    }
}

Does anyone know of the reason it's done like it is and is there any reason to change the way I write it? I think it's easier to read.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by nneonneo, Hovercraft Full Of Eels, pb2q, Lucifer, Jeremy J Starcher Oct 1 '12 at 4:05

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
This is not a question for Stackoverflow. The second variant is mostly used because it saves some lines of codes –  Jan Koester Sep 30 '12 at 1:16
    
IMHO readability is the same but less lines makes 2 option better –  Pshemo Sep 30 '12 at 1:17
1  
It's all just a matter of preference. Personally I like the latter way (but with spaces before the braces), because it's a bit more compact, but this really is just a matter of preference (and/or your company's coding standards, if applicable). –  nneonneo Sep 30 '12 at 1:17
1  
Learn both styles, and follow the style set out by your boss, company, instructor, etc... The key is for all folks working on the same project to use a consistent and reproducible style. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 30 '12 at 1:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is one of those "there is no right answer"

The way you indent your code is called the Allman Style

While the other style is Kernel Normal Form (KNF)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, interesting article. –  Alex Musk Sep 30 '12 at 1:24

The examples you use follow the style Sun suggests, which is a variant of what is known as K&R style. But it doesn't matter, except insofar as code is nicer to read if you're consistent within a project. But it's not a big deal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indent_style

share|improve this answer

While both are valid and accepted styles, the second is more common in examples (web, books, etc) simply to save space.

share|improve this answer

As long as you avoid the first format if you port Java projects to JavaScript, you'll be fine.
In JavaScript, if you miss a semicolon, the compiler attempts to insert it for you.
As you might guess, this can lead to debugging-hilarity at times. Usually, it's semi-sane at detecting when not to insert a semicolon at the end of a line, but rather than learn all edge-cases, just don't do it.

But for Java, knock yourself out.
Your compiler is going to scream at you if you don't end a statement, so it's never going to get confused about what is an assignment and what is a control block.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.