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Generating random integer from a range

I am trying to create a program where the computer guesses a number the user has in his/her mind. The only user input required is whether the guess was too high, too low, or correct. I'm having a problem generating a random number between two variables that store the min and max based on previous guesses. Here is my code:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <ctime>

    using namespace std;

    int main()
    {
        srand(static_cast <unsigned int> (time(0)));

        int compGuess = rand() % 100 +1; //Generates number between 1 - 100
        int highestNumber = 100;
        int lowestNumber = 1;
        char ready;
        char highLowSuccess;
        bool success;
        int tries = 0;


        cout << "Please pick a number between 1 - 100. I will guess your number. Don't tell me what it is!\n\n";


        do
        {
            cout << "Are you ready? (y/n)\n\n";
            cin >> ready;

            if (ready == 'y')
            {
                do
                {
                    cout << "Is your number " << compGuess << "?\n\n";
                    cout << "High, Low or Success?";
                    ++tries;
                    cin >> highLowSuccess; //User input telling the computer whether its too high, too low, or a success

                    if (highLowSuccess == 'h') //Executes code if number guessed was too high.
                    {

                        highestNumber = compGuess - 1; //Stores variable indicating the highest possible number based on user input
                        compGuess = rand() % highestNumber +1; //Generates a new random number between 1 and the new highest possible number
                        success = false;
                    }

                    else if (highLowSuccess == 'l') //Executes code if number guessed was too low.
                    {
                        lowestNumber = compGuess + 1;//Stores variable indicating the lowest possible number based on user input
                        compGuess = (rand() % highestNumber - lowestNumber + 1) + lowestNumber // <---- Not producing the desired result
                        success = false;
                    }

                    else if (highLowSuccess == 's') //Executes code if the computer's guess was correct.
                    {
                        cout << "I guessed your number! It only took me " << tries << " tries!";
                        success = true;
                    }


                } while (success != true);
            }


            else
            {
             continue;
            }

       } while (ready != 'y');



    return 0;

    }

highestNumber is what the max should be and lowestNumber is what the min should be. I need an equation that lets me generate a random number while taking the highest and lowest possible numbers into account.

Forgive me if the answer is really simple, I'm a noob programmer. xD

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marked as duplicate by Carl Norum, Bobrovsky, jonsca, BЈовић, Eitan T Sep 30 '12 at 17:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Replace 100 with highestNumber and replace 1 with lowestNumber? –  Blender Sep 30 '12 at 1:38
    
And besides being a dupe, it looks like you were on the right track anyway. You just have an order-of-operations problem on your line marked "not producing the desired result". Parenthesize correctly and you'll be good. There are many example answers here. –  Carl Norum Sep 30 '12 at 2:26
    
@CarlNorum : Sorry for the duplicate. =( –  Jammin Sep 30 '12 at 3:28

4 Answers 4

To generate a random number between min and max, use:

int randNum = rand()%(max-min + 1) + min;

(Includes max and min)

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2  
This answer is probably good enough for most uses, but the OP should be aware that this method has a bit of a bias towards the low end if the range of rand() isn't divisible by max - min + 1. –  Carl Norum Sep 30 '12 at 2:07
    
Could you tell me a little more about it? What does the "range of rand()" mean? –  Sidharth Mudgal Sep 30 '12 at 2:10
    
rand returns numbers between 0 and RAND_MAX. That's RAND_MAX + 1 possible input values to your modulo. There are max - min + 1 possible output values. If the ratio of inputs to outputs isn't an integer, then you're ending up with a small bias towards the lower numbers. Imagine writing out all RAND_MAX + 1 inputs: 0, 1, 2, ... RAND_MAX, right? Now write out underneath them the post-modulo ones (for min = 0 and max = 5), say: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc. Now if RAND_MAX isn't divisible by 6, you get a partial cycle 0, 1, 2 ... –  Carl Norum Sep 30 '12 at 2:13
    
... or something like at the end. That means there are more 0, 1, 2 outputs than 3, 4, 5 outputs - giving your algorithm a bias towards the 0, 1, 2 answers. –  Carl Norum Sep 30 '12 at 2:14
    
Ah! I get your point. Thanks. –  Sidharth Mudgal Sep 30 '12 at 2:20

Really fast, really easy:

srand(time(NULL)); // Seed the time
int finalNum = rand()%(max-min)+min; // Generate the number, assign to variable.

And thats it, however this is biased towards the lower end, but if you are using C++ TR1/C++11 you can do it using the random header to avoid that bias like so:

#include <random>

std::mt19937 rng(seed);
std::uniform_int_distribution<int> gen(min, max); // uniform, unbiased

int r = gen(rng);

But you can also remove the bias in normal C++ like this:

int rangeRandomAlg2 (int min, int max){
    int n = max - min + 1;
    int remainder = RAND_MAX % n;
    int x;
    do{
        x = rand();
    }while (x >= RAND_MAX - remainder);
    return min + x % n;
}

and that was gotten from this post.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is probably good enough for most uses, but the OP should be aware that this method has a bit of a bias towards the low end if the range of rand() isn't divisible by max - min + 1. –  Carl Norum Sep 30 '12 at 2:08
    
@CarlNorum, I updated my answer to reflect that. –  Link Sep 30 '12 at 2:15
    
Looks good. +1 for you. –  Carl Norum Sep 30 '12 at 2:16
    
@CarlNorum, also showed how to remove bias in normal C++ as well. :D –  Link Sep 30 '12 at 2:23
    
@Link : I'll keep the example for removing bias for future use since the bias isn't a big issue right now. Thanks a lot! –  Jammin Sep 30 '12 at 3:29

If you have a C++11 compiler you can prepare yourself for the future by using c++'s pseudo random number faculties:

//make sure to include the random number generators and such
#include <random>
//the random device that will seed the generator
std::random_device seeder;
//then make a mersenne twister engine
std::mt19937 engine(seeder());
//then the easy part... the distribution
std::uniform_int_distribution<int> dist(min, max);
//then just generate the integer like this:
int compGuess = dist(engine);

That might be slightly easier to grasp, being you don't have to do anything involving modulos and crap... although it requires more code, it's always nice to know some new C++ stuff...

Hope this helps - Luke

share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, I'm not using a C++11 compiler. Sorry, I guess I should have mentioned my compiler in the OP –  Jammin Sep 30 '12 at 3:31
rand() % ((highestNumber - lowestNumber) + 1) + lowestNumber
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is probably good enough for most uses, but the OP should be aware that this method has a bit of a bias towards the low end if the range of rand() isn't divisible by highestNumber - lowestNumber + 1. –  Carl Norum Sep 30 '12 at 2:08
    
@dmakaitis : Thank you, got it working now. –  Jammin Sep 30 '12 at 3:32

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