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I was looking at another page here on stackoverflow and came across a working implementation of cycle sort, but I don't understand how a statement with a semicolon can exist before the curly braces in a while loop. I thought that the while loop is supposed to completely terminate and take no further actions once it finds a statement with a semicolon, so how is it that the code within the curly braces is getting executed? At first glance, I would interpret this as "var" gets incremented with each iteration of the while loop - but I know this is not the case because removing it from that spot and putting the "var++" inside of the curly braces causes an infinite loop.

Under exactly which condition is "var" incremented? Either an explanation, or a link that explains similar syntax:

while (checkSomeBool) var++;
{
   //other stuff happening in here
}

would be appreciated. Thank you. Below is the code taken from CycleSort

public static final <T extends Comparable<T>> int cycleSort(final T[] array) {
int writes = 0;

// Loop through the array to find cycles to rotate.
for (int cycleStart = 0; cycleStart < array.length - 1; cycleStart++) {
  T item = array[cycleStart];

  // Find where to put the item.
  int pos = cycleStart;
  for (int i = cycleStart + 1; i < array.length; i++)
    if (array[i].compareTo(item) < 0) pos++;

  // If the item is already there, this is not a cycle.
  if (pos == cycleStart) continue;

  // Otherwise, put the item there or right after any duplicates.
  <while (item.equals(array[pos])) pos++;
  {
    final T temp = array[pos];
    array[pos] = item;
    item = temp;
  }
  writes++;

  // Rotate the rest of the cycle.
  while (pos != cycleStart) {
    // Find where to put the item.
    pos = cycleStart;
    for (int i = cycleStart + 1; i < array.length; i++)
      if (array[i].compareTo(item) < 0) pos++;

    // Put the item there or right after any duplicates.
    while (item.equals(array[pos])) pos++;
    {
      final T temp = array[pos];
      array[pos] = item;
      item = temp;
    }
    writes++;
  }
} 
return writes;

}

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1  
It is definitely screwy code (though nowhere near the screwiest I've ever seen). –  Hot Licks Sep 30 '12 at 3:00
    
It may help to read it like this: while (checkSomeBool) { var++; } { // other stuff } –  alpha123 Sep 30 '12 at 3:00
1  
I agree with Hot Licks. I think that the author was trying to be misleading. –  Stephen C Sep 30 '12 at 4:42
    
Thanks everyone. I haven't done very much coding, so this was my first time ever seeing the entire "while" on only one line. –  Krondorian Sep 30 '12 at 4:53
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The while loop ends with var++

while (checkSomeBool) var++; // while ends here

The code after that is not part of the while loop at all.

{
   //other stuff happening in here - not part of the while loop
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. so checkSomeBool had better involve var (as it does in the OP code), otherwise the loop is executed never or endlessly. –  Thilo Sep 30 '12 at 3:12
    
yes, likely so. unless there's another thread modifying the value of the boolean in the condition, still without a wait call, this is likely to cause a little cpu-lock.. –  techfoobar Sep 30 '12 at 3:14
    
I was overly vague with the condition within parentheses in my OP. Yes, that boolean condition should indeed have 'var' in there somewhere. The actual code that I was working with is: while (item.equals(array[pos])) pos++; –  Krondorian Sep 30 '12 at 4:36
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C-like languages allow you to enclose arbitrary code in braces to create a block scope, with or without other syntactic constructs.
The code in the braces is being executed as ordinary code after the loop.

If you take out the while line completely, it will still run.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't realize that curly braces also served this purpose. Thanks. –  Krondorian Sep 30 '12 at 4:27
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