Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to selectively (and reliably) turn off processing of sampleBuffers in my captureOutput:didOutputSampleBuffer:fromConnection: method. As you know it's called from a GCD queue and not on the main thread... but I'm taking user input from a UIButton (on the main thread of course) and telling my camera object to halt all processing by setting a BOOL flag.

However, sometimes I'm seeing 1 extra frame slip through the cracks after processing was supposedly stopped. Is there any way I can be absolutely sure that nothing will be processed after the button is pressed? Right now I'm doing a trivial test:

// in ViewController:
- (IBAction)tappedStop:(id)sender {
    NSLog("stop processing!");
    _camera.capturing = NO;
}

// in my camera obj:
- (void)captureOutput:(AVCaptureOutput *)captureOutput did... {
    if (!capturing) {
        return;
    }
    NSLog(@"processing!");
}

I've tried using @synchronized, a static BOOL, and using a semaphore, but to no avail... sometimes that extra frame still sneaks in. Anyone have and ideas? There's probably some GCD method that does what I want but I'm not sure how to go about it.

Here's how the results (sometimes) look in my debug console (shortened to make it more readable):

2012-09-29 23:29:01.869 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:01.910 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:01.953 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:01.994 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.047 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.078 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.121 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.166 -[ViewController tappedButton:] [Line 913] stop processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.161 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
...

But usually (about 4 out of 5 times) my console looks like:

2012-09-29 23:29:01.869 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:01.910 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:01.953 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:01.994 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.047 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.078 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.121 __33-_block_invoke_0 [Line 322] processing!
2012-09-29 23:29:02.166 -[ViewController tappedButton:] [Line 913] stop processing!

I should probably also mention that I don't have access to the original queue that's calling captureOutput:didOutput... since it's in a superClass of a framework that I can't control.

share|improve this question
    
What measurement besides that log do you have? Because it's placed before you set the flag. Maybe it's just a typo, but no matter how much synchronization you do that measurement technique will still sometimes show the logs you're producing. Also, is part of your requirement that processing bail out when this flag is set? –  Carl Veazey Sep 30 '12 at 8:25
    
Hey, is it OK to remove the "gcd" tag, since we already have "grand-central-dispatch", and add "race-condition"? –  Carl Veazey Oct 2 '12 at 0:58
    
The only measurement I was using was showing/hiding a view to see if frames were actually still being output. I know it's kind of misleading since the timestamp on the "extra frame" in the debug output happened BEFORE my "stop processing" line (2012-09-29 23:29:02.161). Re: tags, sure if you think that helps more, go for it. –  taber Oct 2 '12 at 16:23
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I dunno why I didn't think of this sooner, but if I wrap my entire captureOutput:didOutput... method in an async call to the main thread, even though it seems kind of non-ideal, turning off sampleBuffer processing works as expected. I guess it makes sense; my touch event always comes from the main thread, and since I don't have a handle on which thread was used in my buffer output queue, the only way (that I can see) to reliably check isRecording is to do so from the main thread too.

- (void)captureOutput:(AVCaptureOutput *)captureOutput did... {
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        if (!isRecording) {
            return;
        }

        NSLog(@"processing!");

        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_BACKGROUND, 0), ^{
            // do actual processing
        });
    });
}

If anyone has any other suggestions though I'd love to hear 'em. Thanks!

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I went with in the end, but thanks a lot for the suggestions, I appreciate it. –  taber Oct 2 '12 at 16:20
add comment

You could use a serial dispatch queue local to your camera class to serve as a type of mutex. The basic idea is that all of the work that needed to be in sync would be dispatched to that queue - the setting (and possibly getting) of the capturing variable, as well as the work done in the callback. This required me to move all the synchronization work into the camera itself. I've kept the logs as part of the synchronized work so that you can accurately detect whether the code was executed in order or not. It seems to work fine running 60 times a second to simulate 60 fps video capture.

Camera.h:

@interface Camera : NSObject

@property (nonatomic,getter = isCapturing) BOOL capturing;

@end

Camera.m

#define CALLBACK_INTERVAL (1.0/60.0)

@implementation Camera {
    dispatch_queue_t _sync_queue;
    BOOL _capturing;
}

- (id)init
{
    if (self = [super init])
    {
        _capturing = YES;
        _sync_queue = dispatch_queue_create("com.mycompany.whatever", NULL);
        [self performSelector:@selector(triggerCallback) withObject:nil afterDelay:CALLBACK_INTERVAL];
    }

    return self;
}


- (void)setCapturing:(BOOL)capturing
{
    dispatch_async(_sync_queue, ^{
        _capturing = capturing;
        if (!_capturing)
            NSLog(@"STOP");
    });
}

- (void)repeatingCallback
{
    dispatch_async(_sync_queue, ^{
        if (!_capturing)
            return;
        NSLog(@"WORKING");
    });
}

- (void)triggerCallback
{
    [NSObject cancelPreviousPerformRequestsWithTarget:self];
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
        [self repeatingCallback];
    });
    [self performSelector:@selector(triggerCallback) withObject:nil afterDelay:CALLBACK_INTERVAL];
}

@end

And in the view controller:

- (IBAction)stopCapturing:(id)sender
{
    self.camera.capturing = NO;
}

Hope this helps and let me know if you have any questions. One thing to consider is how long the processing work takes compared to the frequency of the callbacks. If it takes considerably longer such that large amounts of work build up on the queue, then _capturing might take some time to get changed after tapping, which sounds like it might be unacceptable, but should still stop any processing not in the queue at the time it was tapped.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would do this

// in ViewController:
- (IBAction)tappedStop:(id)sender {
    NSLog("stop processing!");
    dispatch_async(capture_dispatch_queue, ^{_camera.capturing = NO;});
}

This will cause the block to be inserted into the serial dispatch queue. It will execute before any more imaging processing blocks get processed. As it is right now you have a race condition on the _camera.capturing variable. This will solve the race condition by executing the set of the variable serially with respect to the capture callback.

EDIT:

I should probably also mention that I don't have access to the original queue that's calling captureOutput:didOutput... since it's in a superClass of a framework that I can't control.

I missed that part. That is tough. You technically can get access to it via the Objective-C runtime. However, if that iVar ever changes names your code would break. Perhaps in your situation the solution you devised is best. I will think about it though. Nice problem.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.