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I have a GLib Hash table I created with:

GHashTable *gmem = g_hash_table_new_full(NULL, NULL, (GDestroyNotify) free_memoryaddresses, (GDestroyNotify)free_metadatarecords);

In Valgrind I get the following error:

==19610== 1 errors in context 2 of 2:
==19610== Invalid free() / delete / delete[] / realloc()
==19610==    at 0x40291BE: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:427)
==19610==    by 0x804939F: free_memoryaddresses (memory.c:361)
==19610==    by 0x4077A0F: g_hash_table_remove_all_nodes (ghash.c:533)
==19610==    by 0x4078A7F: g_hash_table_remove_all (ghash.c:1345)
==19610==    by 0x8048BCA: m61_printstatistics (m61.c:115)
==19610==    by 0x80494E9: main (mytest.c:9)
==19610==  Address 0x4341b50 is 0 bytes inside a block of size 1 free'd
==19610==    at 0x40291BE: free (vg_replace_malloc.c:427)
==19610==    by 0x8048994: m61_free (m61.c:51)
==19610==    by 0x80494E4: main (mytest.c:8)

I have no memory leaks. But If i comment out the lines in these two functions, then I get memory leaks and (ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 0 from 0))

void free_memoryaddresses(gpointer a)
{   (void)a;
    free(a);
}

void free_metadatarecords(gpointer a)
{   (void)a;
    free_metadata_record(a);
    free(a);
}

This is my Valgrind command:

G_SLICE=always-malloc G_DEBUG=gc-friendly valgrind --leak-check=yes --tool=memcheck --track-origins=yes -v ./mytest

I'm getting the memory keys by storing pointers received from malloc.

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Where are you getting the hashtable keys from? –  nneonneo Sep 30 '12 at 4:28
    
@nneonneo, I've rewritten my question as valgrind had an older copy of the code, but the overall error is still the same. I got the hashtable keys from pointers returned from malloc. –  user994165 Sep 30 '12 at 5:10

1 Answer 1

It turns out I was calling "free" twice. I forgot that my "free" wrapper called free and all I had left to do was to free the metadata, not the actual pointers.

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