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I ran across this unexpected behavior while trying to debug pyparsing code:

string1 = "this is a test string : that behaves as I expect\n"
string2 = "this string does not behave as I expect\n"

field = CharsNotIn(":\n")
line = field + ZeroOrMore(Literal(":") + field) + LineEnd()

print line.parseString(string1)
print line.parseString(string2)

This produces the following output:

['this is a test string ', ':', ' that behaves as I expect', '\n']
['this string does not behave as I expect']

For some reason the parser is able to pick up the end of line character in string1, but it's unable to pick it up in string2. I can't even understand how it was able to produce a match for string2 if it didn't pick up the end of line.

This behavior seems particular to end of line characters as using a character other than end of line seems to work fine:

string1 = "this is a test string : that behaves as I expect*"
string2 = "this string also behaves as I expect*"

field = CharsNotIn(":*")
line = field + ZeroOrMore(Literal(":") + field) + Literal("*")

print line.parseString(string1)
print line.parseString(string2)

This produces:

['this is a test string ', ':', ' that behaves as I expect', '*']
['this string also behaves as I expect', '*']
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1 Answer 1

Print line to see the pseudo-regex it's matching.

>>> print line
{!W:(:
) [{":" !W:(:
)}]... LineEnd}

If I understand this right, it's looking for non colon non newline characters, which stops at the first newline (which in your example string2, takes the entire line), then looks for a colon and more words, if they exist (they don't), then the newline. My guess is the newline instance is getting dropped somehow, not that your assertion that it would not match the string if it couldn't match the newline is false.

>>> print line.parseString('xyzyy')
['xyzyy']

This does leave the question why it matches even without the newline...

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