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input.c file:

#include "input.h"
void file_processing( FILE *course_file, FILE *student_file )
{
    char buf[256], line[256];
    ........
}

input.h file:

#ifndef STUDENT_H
#define STUDENT_H

#include <string.h>

void process_command( char command[256] );

void file_processing( FILE *course_file, FILE *student_file );

#endif

main.c file:

#include "input.h"

int main( int argc, char *argv[] ){
    .........
    file_processing(course_file, student_file);
    ...
    return 0;
}

The compiler is throwing me this error:

main.c: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
main.c:53:46: error: ‘file_processing’ was not declared in this scope

Anyone can give me some hints on what to look at?

UPDATE: After some extra coding, I'm getting a different error.

/tmp/ccJ4nsnm.o: In function `main':
main.c:(.text+0x1e5): undefined reference to `file_processing(_IO_FILE*, _IO_FILE*)'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
share|improve this question
1  
What compiler are you using - if it is gcc you can use the -E option to give you some clues how the preprocessor is reading your code –  Adrian Cornish Sep 30 '12 at 4:35
1  
Is input.h file in the directory where the main.c is ? If not, did you specify the compiler where to look for the headers ? –  Mahesh Sep 30 '12 at 4:36
    
I'm using gcc, and using -E, input.h only appears once (# 1 "input.h" 1) and nothing else appears. It is in the same directory. –  user1043625 Sep 30 '12 at 4:39
    
You need to use it with the main.c file –  Adrian Cornish Sep 30 '12 at 4:41
    
Yeah, I'm using it with main.c, Fred answered the question. :) –  user1043625 Sep 30 '12 at 4:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I find it interesting that your multiple inclusion protection does not match your file name:

#ifndef STUDENT_H
#define STUDENT_H

Did you get that from another .h file that's also being included?

share|improve this answer
    
Oh yeah, you're right. Damn, not sure how I missed that. :p –  user1043625 Sep 30 '12 at 4:44
    
@user1043625: Probably a copy/paste error. Happens all the time. –  Fred Larson Sep 30 '12 at 4:53
    
@FredLarson Am I missing something stupid, why does it have to match (except for good coding standards) –  Adrian Cornish Sep 30 '12 at 4:55
    
@AdrianCornish: It wouldn't HAVE to match, but it commonly would. It looks like a header guard that belongs to a student.h file, doesn't it? So I thought it likely there was another header not mentioned in the question that was also being included and using the same header guard. Looks like I was right. 8v) –  Fred Larson Sep 30 '12 at 4:57
    
@FredLarson Totally a lateral thinking answer - I did not even consider that to be the issue - nice find! –  Adrian Cornish Sep 30 '12 at 4:59

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