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ALL, Here is my code:

std::string version = curl_version();
version = version.substr( version.find( '/' ) + 1 );
int min, max;
int pos = version.find( '.' );
std::stringstream stream( version.substr( 0, pos ) );
version = version.substr( pos + 1 );
stream >> max;
pos = version.find( '.' );
stream.str( version.substr( 0, pos ) );
stream >> min;

I'm just reusing the same stream object but for some reason min variable is not assigned properly.

What am I missing?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Have you verified that the substrings you pick out are in fact well-formed, i.e. actual numbers? – Matt Phillips Sep 30 '12 at 5:40
    
@MattPhillips, Yes. curl_version() gives "libcurl/7.26.0". First, I cut off "libcurl/". Then "max" gets "7", but min does not get 26. – Igor Sep 30 '12 at 5:50
    
Ok, so just to be clear, the last instance of version.substr(0, pos) evaluates to "26"? – Matt Phillips Sep 30 '12 at 5:51
    
Yes, I can see "26" in the stream object under the debugger. – Igor Sep 30 '12 at 6:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is that you can't reuse the same stringstream object, try doing like this instead:

std::string version = curl_version();
version = version.substr( version.find( '/' ) + 1 );
int min, max;
int pos = version.find( '.' );
std::stringstream stream( version.substr( 0, pos ) );
version = version.substr( pos + 1 );
stream >> max;
pos = version.find( '.' );
std::stringstream stream1( version.substr( 0, pos ) );
stream1 >> min;

It seems that when you shift (>>) out of a stringstream and it reaches eof (you can check by calling stream.eof()) a flag is set that prevents further shifting out even if you set (by calling str()) a new associated string object. To make it work, you have to call clear() before shifting out again.

std::string version = curl_version();
version = version.substr( version.find( '/' ) + 1 );
int min, max;
int pos = version.find( '.' );
std::stringstream stream( version.substr( 0, pos ) );
version = version.substr( pos + 1 );
stream >> max;
pos = version.find( '.' );
stream.str( version.substr( 0, pos ) );
str.clear();
stream >> min;
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Is there a reason for it? Is it documented somewhere? I can perfectly fine reuse anything I create just by setting different values. Why not for this class? It has public set() method... – Igor Sep 30 '12 at 6:00
    
In fact this: cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/stringstream gives: "The objects of this class maintain internally a pointer to a stringbuf object that can be obtained/modified by calling member rdbuf". So maybe I'm just doing it wrong? – Igor Sep 30 '12 at 6:03
2  
The documentation says it is equivalent to a set, but even if there are no errors (fail() is false) something is retained, alternatively you can use clear() before str() and use the same object. – imreal Sep 30 '12 at 6:14
    
Yes, stream.clear() worked. Could you please edit you post? Hopefully it will help someone else... – Igor Sep 30 '12 at 6:21

The reason is, that just calling std::stringstream::str does change the internal string, but it doesn't reset any error flags. So when the previous string reached the end of the string or another "error", the stream still thinks it's at this error. Just call std::striungstream::clear to clear the error flags after changing the string.

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