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I'm trying to make an application that runs an animation. To do this I've got a Jframe that contains my subclass of Jpanel in which the animation runs. Here are my two classes:

Firstly, here's my driver class:

import javax.swing.*;

public class Life {
    public static void main(String[] args){
         JFrame game = new JFrame("Life");

         game.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
         game.setSize(500, 500);

         MainPanel mainPanel = new MainPanel();
         game.setContentPane(mainPanel);


         game.setVisible(true);

     }
 }

Secondly, here's my subclass of Jpanel:

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

public class MainPanel extends JPanel implements ActionListener{
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    public MainPanel(){
        super();
    }

    public void paintComponent(Graphics g){
        j++;
        g.drawLine(10,10, 20 + i, 20 + i);
        Timer t = new Timer(1000, this);
        t.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
        i++;
        repaint();
    }
}

Notice that the variable i is incremented each time actionPreformed is called and the variable j is called each time paintComponent is called. What winds up happening is that i starts to be much larger than j and the line drawn by paintComponent seems to grow at a faster and faster rate.

Here are my questions:

  • Why does this happen?
  • How can I sync things up so that the line gets redrawn each every 1000 ms?
  • Given what I'm trying to do, is my approach wrong? Should I be doing things differently?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't start a Swing Timer from within a paintComponent method.

This method should do your painting, only your painting and nothing but painting. It should contain absolutely no program logic. Understand that you have very limited control over this method since you cannot predict when or if it will be called, how often it will be called. You can't even call it yourself or be guaranteed that when you suggest it be called via repaint() that it will in fact be called.

Also this method must be fast, as fast possible since anything that slows it down, be it object creation or reading in files will reduce the perceived responsiveness of your GUI, the last thing that you want to see happen.

The solution is to separate the program logic out of that method and into better methods such as your constructor. Repeating code should be in a Swing Timer.

Edit:
You state:

I just did that to test things out. One more question: What happens if paintComponent, or some thread on which the work in paintComponent depends, takes longer than 1000 ms (or whatever it is) to do its work? The only thing I can think of is having paintComponent paint the progress of the animation so far, rather than waiting for the animation to reach the next step(if that makes any sense). Thoughts?

You should never have code in paintComponent that takes that long or even 10's of milliseconds. If there's a risk of something like that happening, then do the drawing in a background thread and to a BufferedImage, and then on the Swing event thread show the BufferedImage in paintComponent method using the Graphics#drawImage(...) method.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow. I didn't even notice that I had done that. Wow. –  David Sep 30 '12 at 5:27
    
Starting the timer in the constructor appears to work better. Does this sound like the right approach? –  David Sep 30 '12 at 5:29
    
@David: yes, absolutely! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 30 '12 at 5:29
    
@David: also don't increment j (that's program logic code) inside of paintComponent but rather do that in the Timer's ActionListener. Also, you never seem to use the j variable for anything. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 30 '12 at 5:34
    
I just did that to test things out. One more question: What happens if paintComponent, or some thread on which the work in paintComponent depends, takes longer than 1000 ms (or whatever it is) to do its work? The only thing I can think of is having paintComponent paint the progress of the animation so far, rather than waiting for the animation to reach the next step(if that makes any sense). Thoughts? –  David Sep 30 '12 at 5:38

A few minor additions to @HFoE's essential insights:

  • A public start() method is a handy way to ensure that your view is completely constructed before starting.
  • Fields have well-defined default values, and they should be private.
  • Swing GUI objects should be constructed and manipulated only on the event dispatch thread.
  • Override getPreferredSize() and pack() the enclosing Window.

Revised code:

import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.*;

public class Life {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            private final JTabbedPane jtp = new JTabbedPane();

            @Override
            public void run() {
                JFrame game = new JFrame("Life");
                game.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                MainPanel mainPanel = new MainPanel();
                game.setContentPane(mainPanel);
                game.pack();
                game.setVisible(true);
                mainPanel.start();
            }
        });
    }

    private static class MainPanel extends JPanel implements ActionListener {

        private Timer t = new Timer(100, this);
        private int i;
        private int j;

        @Override
        public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            g.drawLine(10, 10, 20 + i, 20 + i);
        }

        public void start() {
            t.start();
        }

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
            i++;
            repaint();
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return new Dimension(500, 500);
        }
    }
}
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1+ as always, great advice! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 30 '12 at 5:44

A Timer by defaults keep on running. Only when you call setRepeats( false ) it will stop.

So the following lines

Timer t = new Timer(1000, this);
t.start();

in your paintComponent method means that after a few repaints you will have a number of Timer instances running, explaining why i increases that much faster then j.

The solution is of course to move your Timer outside the paintComponent method, and stick to one Timer instance.

Further remarks (which weren't said by the others, not gonna repeat their very useful advise):

  • Never override the paintComponent method without calling the super method
  • You shouldn't expose the ActionListener interface. Just use an ActionListener internally
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. Two questions: 1) Why shouldn't i expose the ActionListner interface? 2) How do I just use an ActionListener internally? –  David Sep 30 '12 at 19:50
    
@David 1) That is an implementation detail. Your class is not meant to be used as an ActionListener, so no need to expose it 2) E.g. by using an anonymous class or an inner class –  Robin Sep 30 '12 at 20:13

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