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This thread inspired the question. Here are the code samples again. I'm looking for an answer that tells exactly what is going on.

Both x = 0; x+/*cmt*/+; and var f/*cmt*/oo = 'foo'; produce syntax errors, which renders the answers in this question wrong.

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Why would you want to put comments there anyway? –  elclanrs Sep 30 '12 at 6:52
1  
Just because a comment isn't read, doesn't mean the parser will concatenate the strings and turn it into a valid statement. –  Burhan Khalid Sep 30 '12 at 6:53
    
You can do this: x /* this is a comment */ ++;, I think, but not like yours. –  Alvin Wong Sep 30 '12 at 6:55
    
Just intellectual masturbation. No other reason. –  wwaawaw Sep 30 '12 at 6:56
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The section I linked to talks about comments, and below that are the various tokens. As the input is split up into tokens, the lexical analysis doesn't result in a valid statement, which is why you get an error. –  Burhan Khalid Sep 30 '12 at 7:07
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From ECMAScript reference :

Comments behave like white space and are discarded except that, if a MultiLineComment contains a line terminator character, then the entire comment is considered to be a LineTerminator for purposes of parsing by the syntactic grammar.

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This is like musical acceptance. I've decided to come to rest on this answer, but check out the rest of the thread, as well. It's greatly informative. –  wwaawaw Sep 30 '12 at 7:52
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You're interrupting a word instead of a sentence. ++ and foo are words. People assume you won't be interrupting those.

Much the same as you can't put whitespace in the middle of words even though whitespace is "safe".

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Can you give me a clearer idea of what constitutes a "word" and what consitutes a "sentence", then? –  wwaawaw Sep 30 '12 at 6:51
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@adlwalrus the comment is just like whitespace. Look x = 0; x+/*cmt*/+; is an error because x = 0; x+ +; is an error. –  Theraot Sep 30 '12 at 6:53
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Comment is a different type of token than identifiers, operators and literal constants, so it is similar to whitespace. –  Alvin Wong Sep 30 '12 at 6:54
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Because comments are parsed at the lexical level, generally considered as whitespace.

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When compiling, the first step is to lexically break it up into individual tokens. Comments are one type of token, and operators are another. You're splitting the ++ operator token so that it's interpretted as two separate items.

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As many others have pointed out, the lexical parsing determines how things will become.

Let me point out some example:

ax + ay - 0x01; /* hello */
^----^---------------------- Identifier (variables)
   ^----^------------------- Operator
          ^----------------- literal constant (int)
              ^------------- Statement separator
  ^-^--^-^---  ^------------ Whitespace (ignored)
                [_________]- Comments (ignored)

So the resulting token list will be:

identifier("ax");
operator("+");
identifier("ay");
operator("-");
const((int)0x01);
separator();

But if you do this:

a/* hello */x + ay - 0x01;
^-----------^---^----------- Identifier (variables)
              ^----^-------- Operator
                     ^------ literal constant (int)
                         ^-- Statement separator
             ^-^--^-^------- Whitespace (ignored)
 [_________]---------------- Comments (ignored)

The resulting token list will be:

identifier("a");
identifier("x"); // Error: Unexpected identifier `x` at line whatever
operator("+");
identifier("ay");
operator("-");
const((int)0x01);
separator();

Then same happens when comments inserted inside an operator.

So you can see that comments behave just like whitespace.

In fact, I recently just read an article on writing a simple interpreter with JavaScript. It helped me with this answer. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/345888/How-to-write-a-simple-interpreter-in-JavaScript

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Woah, this answer looks badass. Lemme have a read. –  wwaawaw Sep 30 '12 at 7:42
    
That article link looks awesome! This whole thread is fantastic, I wish I could "accept" multiple answers. –  wwaawaw Sep 30 '12 at 7:45
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