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I have 2 questions about Arrays in Java, hope you can spare your time to help me.

Question 1:

int[] intArray1 = { 1, 4, 2, 5, 6, 7, 2 };  
int[] intArray2 = { 1, 4, 2, 5, 6, 7, 2 };

intArray1.equals(intArray2);

But it returns false?

Question 2:

I run this code:

int[] intArray1 = { 1, 4, 2, 5, 6, 7, 2 };  //2 is duplicated
Arrays.binarySearch(intArray1,2);

and it returns -2.

BUT when I remove duplication:

int[] intArray3 = { 1, 4, 2, 5, 6, 7}; // nothing is duplicated
Arrays.binarySearch(intArray1,2);

now it returns 2, which is the right one.

I don't know how binary Search in Array deals with duplication which lead to -2?

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closed as too localized by Raedwald, Sergey K., Rody Oldenhuis, Erick Robertson, Dan Oct 3 '12 at 11:40

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1  
binary search works just on sorted arrays! – elyashiv Sep 30 '12 at 7:46
    
The array must be sorted for this to work. See docs: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/… – techfoobar Sep 30 '12 at 7:48
    
Thanks for your reply, after I added Arrays.sort(intArray1); and Arrays.sort(intArray2); the binarySearch does work! But the equals is still false – mochi Sep 30 '12 at 7:49
    
Looks like [Homework], to me. – Raedwald Oct 1 '12 at 11:54
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Regarding question 1: arrays inherit the default implementation of equals() from Object, which returns true only if the two objects are identical. You can test arrays for equality of contents using:

Arrays.equals(intArray1, intArray2);

Regarding question 2: Unless the array is sorted, binary search returns unpredictable (and often wrong) results. That it happens to work on a specific unsorted array is a coincidence.

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It is normal you get strange results when calling binarySearch on an array that is not sorted. It is explicit in the javadoc:

Searches the specified array of ints for the specified value using the binary search algorithm. The array must be sorted (as by the sort method, above) prior to making this call. If it is not sorted, the results are undefined. If the array contains multiple elements with the specified value, there is no guarantee which one will be found.

The equals returns false as it should: you created two different arrays, and equals tells you the two arrays are different, event though their contents are similar. Arrays.equals implements the structural comparison you meant to use.

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Array objects in Java do not override the equals() method. Thus you must use utility method Arrays.equals():

Arrays.equals(intArray1, intArray2);

Binary search only works on sorted arrays:

Arrays.sort(intArray1);
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Question 1 :

In this case equals compares objects(i.e. pointers) not their content. You have created two different objects and equals returns false as expected.

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Not quite, the default implementation of equals from Object compares pointers. Other classes can overide this. – weston Sep 30 '12 at 8:31
    
@weston - Of course I meant 'In this case, equals ...'. Edited to make it clear. – Grisha Sep 30 '12 at 15:10

Question #1: The equals() method compares the reference of the objects and not the content within the reference as such. Hence the equals() method fails for your case. One way to compare would be use Arrays.equals(int[] a, int[] a2). According to the Javadoc:

Returns true if the two specified arrays of Objects are equal to one another. The two arrays are considered equal if both arrays contain the same number of elements, and all corresponding pairs of elements in the two arrays are equal. Two objects e1 and e2 are considered equal if (e1==null ? e2==null : e1.equals(e2)). In other words, the two arrays are equal if they contain the same elements in the same order. Also, two array references are considered equal if both are null.

Question #2: From the Javadoc for binarySearch(int[] a, int key):

Searches the specified array of ints for the specified value using the binary search algorithm. The array must be sorted (as by the sort(int[]) method) prior to making this call. If it is not sorted, the results are undefined. If the array contains multiple elements with the specified value, there is no guarantee which one will be found.

So, you would need an array which is sorted and also without duplicates for this method to work correctly.

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Actually, the relevant method in this case is Arrays.equals(int[] a, int[] a2). – Ted Hopp Sep 30 '12 at 7:55
    
@TedHopp: I copy-pasted the wrong signature from the Javadoc. Thanks for pointing this out! Edited my post :) – Sujay Sep 30 '12 at 7:57

- First of all binary-search is to be applied on a sorted array, thats the reason for the abnormal behaviour.

- Secondly, you should use method Arrays.equals():

Arrays.equals(intArray1, intArray2);

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